Friday, July 6, 2012

[G] Everyone's Coming up to the City of Roses

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Google Open Source Blog: Everyone's Coming up to the City of Roses

As the temperatures rise in the northern hemisphere, Googlers from across the world will travel to the City of Roses, (Portland, Oregon) for OSCON, O’Reilly’s 14th annual Open Source convention held July 16-20 at the Oregon Convention Center. Over 2,500 open source enthusiasts from around the world will congregate for sessions and tutorials on everything open source.

This year 18 Googlers will be talking and teaching on a variety of topics with another 30 or so attending the weeklong conference. The schedule of the talks by Googlers are listed below in chronological order.

Monday, July 16th
7:00pm
Google Summer of Code Birds of a Feather (BoF) - All past and present participants in the Google Summer of Code program are welcome to join us, all you need is a free Expo Only Hall pass for OSCON.

Tuesday, July 17th
1:30pm
Andrew Gerrand - “Building real software with Go”

Wednesday, July 18th
10:40am 
Wesley Chun - “Python 3: the Next Generation (is here already)”
Joe Gregorio - “Scaling to 100+ APIs”
Rob Pike and Andrew Gerrand - “The Go 1 Programming Environment”

1:40pm 
Bob Evans - “Experience Sampling Experience”
Alex Martelli - "Permission or Forgiveness?”

Thursday, July 19th
10:40am
Bob Nystrom - “Dart: Google’s evil plot to make it easier for you to build web apps”

11:30am
Christopher Swenson - “Google Government Public Data: Finding and delivering the world’s government, tabular data”

1:40pm
Chris DiBona - “Ask a Google Engineer Anything”
Google will again sponsor its popular “Ask Google Engineers Anything” session. The session is intended to help developers work better with Googlers and Google technology and to answer most of the questions that developers might be puzzled about.
Ben Collins-Sussman and Brian Fitzpatrick - “The Art of Organizational Manipulation”

2:30pm
Alice Boxhall - “Web Application Accessibility”
Wesley Chun - “Connecting to Twitter and Google+ using Python”

3:20pm
Bob Nystrom - “Office Hour with Bob Nystrom”

Friday, July 20th
9:05am
Chris DiBona - “Keynote”

10:00am
Chris DiBona, Shawn Pearce - and Carol Smith - “The Google Open Source Update”
Augie Fackler and Nathaniel Manista - “Stop Mocking, Start Testing”
Justin McWilliams - “Using and Building Open Source in Google Corporate Engineering”

For a complete schedule of talks at OSCON, you can visit the conference site. We hope to see you at OSCON!


By Stephanie Taylor, Open Source Programs
URL: http://google-opensource.blogspot.com/2012/07/everyones-coming-up-to-city-of-roses.html

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

[G] Google Research Awards: Summer, 2012

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Research Blog: Google Research Awards: Summer, 2012

Posted by Maggie Johnson, Director of Education & University Relations

We’ve just finished the review process for the latest round of the Google Research Awards, which is our bi-annual open call for proposals on research in areas of mutual interest with Google. Our funding provides full-time faculty the opportunity to fund a graduate student and work directly with Google research scientists and engineers.

This round, we are funding 104 awards across 21 different focus areas for a total of nearly $6 million. The subject areas that received the highest level of support this time were systems and infrastructure, human computer interaction, and mobile. In addition, 28% of the funding was awarded to universities outside the U.S.

Given that our program is merit-based, we make funding decisions via committees of experts, who assess each proposal by its impact, innovation, relevance to Google, and other factors. Over the past two years, we have seen significant growth in the Research Award program. This round, we had 815 proposals—up 11% from last round, which required 1,946 reviews by 654 reviewers.   

Our award committees represent a microcosm of Research @ Google. Not only do we work with research scientists in making funding decisions, but also engineers—many of whom have advanced degrees in Computer Science. Our research organization has a similar make-up: both research scientists and engineers working together on innovative projects that are product-focused and relevant to our customers.

Congratulations to the well-deserving recipients of this round’s awards. If you are interested in applying for the next round (deadline is October 15), please visit our website for more information.
URL: http://googleresearch.blogspot.com/2012/07/google-research-awards-summer-2012.html

[G] Supporting the digital economy in Mauritius

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Google Public Policy Blog: Supporting the digital economy in Mauritius

Posted by Winter Casey, Senior Policy Analyst

Thanks to the Internet, trade has never been easier. The ability to trade goods and services online has helped companies large and small to reach a global marketplace. And the web has also enabled another important cross-border transaction: the free flow of information without restriction.

This month, yet another country acknowledged the importance of having a consistent framework for cross-border flows of goods, services, and information. Mauritius is the first African country to sign a joint agreement with the U.S. that supports government transparency, open Internet networks, and cross-border information flows.

This agreement has significant implications for Mauritius’ economy. While South Africa hasn’t yet fully embraced the Internet, the sector already contributes up to 2 percent (or $7.1 billion/R59-billion) of the country’s GDP, according to a recent report by World Wide Worx. As the Internet grows, countries that are open to the free flow of goods and information will enable their businesses to trade, negotiate and advertise freely. In the long run, these solid business practices will lead to more exports and more jobs.

We encourage more governments and industries to take action so that their citizens have access to the Internet and their businesses are able to sell goods and services across borders, with the help of the Internet.

URL: http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.com/2012/07/supporting-digital-economy-in-mauritius.html

[G] Find the perfect app with a little help from your Google+ friends

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Google Chrome Blog: Find the perfect app with a little help from your Google+ friends

Since I started working on the Chrome Web Store, all my friends have been asking me which apps to try out. Between checking with colleagues for their suggestions and creating shared lists on Google spreadsheets, I thought there must be an easier way to share my favorite apps with the rest of the world.

Starting today, the Chrome Web Store helps you do just that. You can now share all of your favorite Chrome Web Store items with people in your Google+ circles by finding them in the Chrome Web Store and clicking the +1 button located in their store detail page.


You can also review app, extension and theme recommendations from anyone in your Google+ circles simply by clicking on the “From your circles” link, located in the left category menu in the Chrome Web Store. And for those of you who are relatively new to Google+, we’ve also included suggestions from some of us in the Chrome team.


To make finding the right app even easier, all apps that have been +1’d by someone in your circles will be indicated as such throughout the Chrome Web Store, helping you decide which apps to install.


We hope that this new feature will help you share the best that the store has to offer and discover great new content from your friends. If you don’t have a Google+ account, you can easily sign up; go here to get started.

Posted by Hui Guo, Software Engineer
URL: http://chrome.blogspot.com/2012/07/find-perfect-app-with-little-help-from.html

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

[G] Fairfax Media Goes Google

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Official Google Enterprise Blog: Fairfax Media Goes Google

Posted by Stuart McLean, Head of Google Enterprise Australia and New Zealand

(Cross-post note from the Official Google Australia Blog.)


In an increasingly web-enabled world, the speed of sharing information continues to increase at a stunning acceleration. This has changed the way businesses in every vertical operate, but no field has been more impacted than the media sector – businesses that deal in information itself.

Today Fairfax Media, a leading multi-platform media group in Australasia, announces that it will provide its employees with Google Apps for Business. This makes Fairfax Media one of the largest Google Apps customers in the Asia-Pacific region, and they join fellow Australian companies such as Visy, Jetstar, Flight Centre and Ray White. After a successful Google Apps pilot program earlier this year, Fairfax will now work with Google Apps Premier Reseller, Cloud Sherpas, to ensure all staff have access to Google Apps by November 2012.

The Fairfax Media group comprises metropolitan, rural, regional and community publications and websites across Australia and New Zealand. High profile mastheads include The Sydney Morning Herald, The Australian Financial Review and The Age, along with their corresponding national news websites.

A key part of Fairfax’s business is about quickly, efficiently and expertly providing information and content to its readers and customers — and the multi-tenant communication platform that Google Apps provides will help keep Fairfax at the forefront of its industry. Google Apps is a central part of the company’s “Fairfax of the Future” program transforming it into a “digital first” media organisation.

By taking up the heavy lifting of storing data and managing infrastructure, going Google will allow Fairfax to focus on being a media company and not worry about also being an IT provider. And the real-time collaboration in Docs and communication facilitated through Talk and Google+ Hangouts will allow reporters and editors working in various locations to overcome geographical barriers.

We're excited to see Google Apps as a key piece of Fairfax's transformation into the future model of a media company. These tools will allow Fairfax not just to allow employees to work in the future but to let the entire company better concentrate on the thing they do best — keeping the public informed.
URL: http://googleenterprise.blogspot.com/2012/07/fairfax-media-goes-google.html

[G] Big Tent Sendai: Smarter ways to share information in a crisis

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Official Google Blog: Big Tent Sendai: Smarter ways to share information in a crisis

As we’ve seen in the last decade, information technology can save lives in a crisis. But even as data becomes more crucial to rescue efforts, key information like evacuation routes, shelter locations and weather alerts often remains inaccessible to the public. Time is of the essence in the wake of a disaster, and it's critical for emergency information to be available in open standards and formats to enable instant communication among first responders and affected populations.

This was the theme of our first Big Tent in Asia, held yesterday in Sendai, Japan. The event brought together tech industry leaders, non-profits, volunteers and government officials to discuss how technology can better assist in preparing for, responding to and rebuilding from disasters. This is an extremely pertinent issue for the Asia-Pacific region, as nearly 70 percent of fatalities from natural disasters occur here. And with the earthquake and tsunami last year affecting the coastal regions of Northeastern Japan, Sendai was a particularly meaningful location to discuss new ways that technology can aid the efforts of responders to reduce the impact and cost of disasters.

During the panels, the audience heard stories about how two Pakistani volunteers mapped their home country so well through Google MapMaker that the UN’s mapping agency UNOSAT adopted the maps and provided them to aid workers during the Pakistan floods. Sam Johnson, Founder of the Christchurch Student Army and Young New Zealander of the Year, talked about using Facebook to quickly coordinate relief efforts on the ground after the earthquakes in Christchurch in 2010 and 2011. Twitter Japan Country Manager James Kondo talked about Japanese earthquake victims tweeting with the hashtag “stranded” in order to find help. Meanwhile representatives of open source project Ushahidi talked of “brainsourcing” reporters on the ground and remote volunteers to keep the world abreast of conditions in disasters such as the earthquake in Chile in 2010.

After the panels, conversations and debates, four key themes emerged. First, there is a conflict between traditional closed data architectures and emerging open models—and we need to close the gap between them. Second, we need to find complementary ways to embrace both authoritative data from official sources and crowdsourced data. Third, there’s a universal need for data, but they way it’s shared needs to be tailored to the local environment—for example, Internet-reliant countries vs. SMS-reliant countries. Finally, we were reminded that beyond the data itself, communication and collaboration are key in a crisis. Information isn’t worth anything unless people are taking that information, adapting it, consulting it and getting it to the people who need it.

One of the panels at Big Tent Sendai

Crisis response tools will continue to improve and more people across the globe will own devices to quickly access the information they need. But there are still major challenges we must address. As Margareta Wahlström, UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction said, we can now get quick warnings and alerts to many populations on their phones, but many who receive the alerts don’t know how to act.

To see clips from Sendai and previous events, visit the Big Tent YouTube channel, where you can also join in the debate via comments, get more information on the presenters and see how different communities approach many of the same issues. We’ll hold more Big Tents in Asia soon, so please check back on our website to learn more.

Posted by Nigel Snoad, Product Manager, Google.org Crisis Response Team
URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/07/big-tent-sendai-smarter-ways-to-share.html

[G] Celebrate freedom. Support a free and open Internet.

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Official Google Blog: Celebrate freedom. Support a free and open Internet.

On July Fourth, America celebrates its independence.

In the summer of 1776, 13 disenfranchised colonies spoke. It took days for their declaration to be printed and distributed throughout the colonies, and it took weeks for it to be seen across the Atlantic.

Today, such a document could be published and shared with the world in seconds. More than any time in history, more people in more places have the ability to have their voices heard.

Powering these voices are billions of Internet connections around the world—people on their mobile phones, tablets, laptops and desktops. The Internet is a powerful platform that makes it easier for people to speak, to assemble, and to be heard. This is true no matter where freedom is taking root.

Yet we’ve only just begun to see what a free and open Internet can do for people and for the freedom we cherish.



Today we’re sharing a video we made to celebrate our freedom and the tools that support it. Please take a moment to watch it, share it with your friends, and add your voice.

Join us in supporting a free and open Internet.

Posted by Susan Molinari, Vice President of Public Policy and Government Affairs, Americas
URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/07/celebrate-freedom-support-free-and-open.html

[G] Spring cleaning in summer

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Official Google Blog: Spring cleaning in summer

Technology creates tremendous opportunities to improve people’s lives. But to make the most of them, we need to focus—or we end up doing too much and not having the impact we strive for. So last fall we started a spring clean, and since then we’ve closed or combined more than 30 products. Today we’re announcing a few more closures. Here’s a summary of the changes we’ll be making:

  • The Google Mini has been an important part of our Enterprise Search offering since it was first introduced in 2005. It’s had a good run, but beginning July 31 we’re discontinuing the product because its functionality can be better provided by products like Google Search Appliance, Google Site Search and Google Commerce Search. We will of course continue to provide technical support to Mini customers for the duration of their contracts, and will reach out to them shortly with more details.
  • Google Talk Chatback allowed websites to embed a Google Talk widget so that they could engage with their visitors. It’s now outdated, so we’re turning off Chatback and encouraging websites to use the Meebo bar.
  • Google Video stopped taking uploads in May 2009. Later this summer we’ll be moving the remaining hosted content to YouTube. Google Video users have until August 20 to migrate, delete or download their content. We’ll then move all remaining Google Video content to YouTube as private videos that users can access in the YouTube video manager. For more details, please see our post on the YouTube blog.
  • On November 1, 2013, iGoogle will be retired. We originally launched iGoogle in 2005 before anyone could fully imagine the ways that today's web and mobile apps would put personalized, real-time information at your fingertips. With modern apps that run on platforms like Chrome and Android, the need for iGoogle has eroded over time, so we’ll be winding it down. Users will have 16 months to adjust or export their data.
  • We’ll soon be retiring our Symbian Search App to focus our efforts on our mobile web search experience. We encourage you to go to www.google.com and make it your homepage or bookmark it. Switching from the app to the web experience will enable users to make the most of the web-wide improvements we make for search all the time.

Closing products always involves tough choices, but we do think very hard about each decision and its implications for our users. Streamlining our services enables us to focus on creating beautiful technology that will improve people’s lives.

Posted by Matt Eichner, General Manager, Global Enterprise Search
URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/07/spring-cleaning-in-summer.html

[G] Block ads on your site with the updated Google Publisher Toolbar

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Inside AdSense: Block ads on your site with the updated Google Publisher Toolbar


In January, we launched the AdSense Publisher Toolbar to help you save time and monitor account performance directly from your pages. If you’re one of the over 31,000 publishers who have already installed this handy Chrome extension, you’ve probably noticed that we’ve renamed it to the Google Publisher Toolbar, as it now supports DoubleClick for Publishers as well. We’ve also been working on other major enhancements, and today we’re excited to share them with you.



The biggest improvement you’ll notice in the toolbar is the addition of blocking capabilities, enabling you to block ads as you’re viewing your site. When you see an ad that isn’t suitable for your audience, you’ll be able to take action immediately without needing to navigate through your account or investigate which ad or URL to block.



Here’s how it works, once you’ve installed the toolbar: Just as before, you can view account performance in a widget in the corner of your Chrome window, as well as ad overlays on the page itself. Clicking on one of the ad overlays will now bring up additional information about that ad unit, including the name of the ad slot, performance metrics, the destination and display URL of the ad, and a preview of the ad. Below the ad preview, you can take action on either the ad or the URL: If you are using the Ad Review Center, you can choose to block the ad directly and your action will be reflected the next time you visit the Ad Review Center. If you block a URL, it’ll be added to your URL filter list.








Please be assured that clicking the ad overlays generated by the toolbar is permitted, and won’t generate any invalid clicks. Also, keep in mind that blocking any ad will lower your potential earnings, as it reduces competition for your ad space by removing advertiser bids from the auction. It’s a myth that filtering ads can prevent ‘low-paying ads’ from appearing, so as always, we recommend blocking only those ads that you feel are unsuitable for your users.





The Google Publisher Toolbar is now available in all AdSense languages, so we encourage all publishers to give it a try. If you’re already using the toolbar, no action is needed on your part as it’ll automatically update. Feel free to let us know your thoughts about the Toolbar on our AdSense +page.





Visit our Help Center for answers to questions related to the Publisher Toolbar, and stay tuned for more updates!





Posted by Gregory Block -- AdSense Engineering



URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/tuAm/~3/nxLiLO3cCdY/block-ads-on-your-site-with-updated_03.html

[G] Inside Map Makerpedia

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Google Lat Long: Inside Map Makerpedia


Less than a year ago, we launched the Map Makerpedia to bring together the collective knowledge and expertise of the Map Maker community into a Wiki-style guide. We recently rolled out an update to the site, which includes a more intuitive layout and revised templates.


We’re thrilled to share these updates and a brief overview of the developments we’ve made over the past few months that have made it an invaluable resource for mappers across the globe.

Map Makerpedia is now divided into three broad categories, “Mapping Tutorials,” “Regional Hubs” and “Community Projects.”

The revised Map Makerpedia layout

The “Mapping Tutorials” pages offer mapping lessons and tutorial videos. Nineteen articles, ranging from “How to map a golf course” to “Mapping roundabouts,” and six videos (in languages as diverse as Russian and Kurdish) currently comprise the Mapping Tutorials section.

Some Help articles in Maps 101

The “Community Projects” section sets the stage for organizers of MapUps to share their event experiences while encouraging others to try their hand at organizing community mapping sessions. From chronicling the efforts of mappers in disaster management and the uplifting of slums, to providing a platform for a veteran mapper to showcase his teaching initiatives, Community Projects is a practical handbook on the benefits of mapping.

Community Projects - on the ground

The “Regional Hubs” section provides a one-stop source for all the regional guidelines. The Regional Hubs not only bring together mappers of one country or territory together under one umbrella, but they also enable mappers from one part of the world to help others across the globe.

Examples of Regional Hubs

Finally, any mention of Map Makerpedia is incomplete without a heartfelt thanks to its amazing contributors! From the sandy dunes of Jordan to paddy-filled Vietnam, from chilly North America to the sunny Asian Sub Continent, with the Pearl of Africa adorning, this is one diverse community.

You too can share your knowledge on Map Makerpedia. Get started!

Posted by Nadeem Ahmed, Map Maker Community team lead
URL: http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/2012/07/inside-map-makerpedia.html

[G] Go indoors at locations across the United Kingdom

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Google Lat Long: Go indoors at locations across the United Kingdom


Given the current British weather, we seem to be spending a lot more of the summer than we’d hoped indoors. The thing about being indoors is that people often get lost - I’m not talking about in your own home, of course, but when you’re out and about, in train stations, museums, department stores and shopping centres.

We’re happy to announce that today Google is launching indoor maps for Android devices in the UK. You’ll no longer need to feel clueless when you’re at the railway station, trying to figure out where to buy a coffee before you rush to catch your train from platform 11; nor will you feel embarrassed about asking for the lingerie section when you’re in the department store - because you’ll have all the answers in the palm of your hand.

Just open Google Maps on your Android mobile phone, zoom in to the location you’re in and the indoor floor plan magically appears. And for buildings where the information is available, we’ll even show you where you are on the map with a familiar blue dot if you’ve enabled the My Location feature. Next, search for the location you’d like to get to (Platform 9¾ at King’s Cross Station or Peter Jones in Sloane Square) and we’ll provide directions to help you get there - even if you’re on a completely different floor.

More than 40 venues in the UK have worked with us to have their indoor floor plans appear on Google, ranging from train stations to art galleries, department stores to sporting venues. In fact, any building owner can upload their maps for future inclusion in Google Maps.

I know that I’ll definitely be using the indoor maps feature this summer to find my way around London as I start my work as a volunteer this summer. And no doubt I’ll also be using it in between my shifts, perhaps for a spot of retail therapy at Peter Jones or to check out the James Bond exhibition at the Barbican.

So whatever the weather, take time to explore the indoors this summer in the UK.

Posted by Razia Ahamed, Geo Indoor Partnerships Lead, UK
URL: http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/2012/07/go-indoors-at-locations-across-united.html

[G] Google Video content moving to YouTube

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YouTube Blog: Google Video content moving to YouTube

Later this summer, all remaining hosted video on Google Video will be moved to YouTube. Google Video stopped taking uploads in May 2009 and now we’re moving the remaining hosted content to YouTube as private videos. Google Video users can rest assured that you won’t be losing any of your content as it will be fully available on YouTube, and you can choose to make those videos public on YouTube if you’d like.



If you would prefer to migrate, delete or download your content yourself, you can do so by visiting the Google Video status page prior to August 20, 2012. After the videos have been moved, you can access all of your videos by visiting the YouTube Video Manager. By default they’ll all be set to private, and you can publish them publicly to your channel at any time. If you haven’t published on YouTube in a while, check out our latest channel designs and more in the YouTube Creator Playbook.



As we said nearly three years ago, the Google Video team is now focused on tackling the challenge of video search. We want to thank the millions of people around the world who have taken the time to create and share videos on Google Video, and we hope that you will continue to share your videos on YouTube.



The YouTube and Google Video Teams


URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/youtube/PKJx/~3/CoEfpuKZBa8/google-video-content-moving-to-youtube.html

[G] A new future: hitting “Refresh” on business technology

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Official Google Enterprise Blog: A new future: hitting “Refresh” on business technology

Posted by Amit Singh, Vice President, Google Enterprise

Over the last two months I had the opportunity to spend time with hundreds of CIOs as we took Atmosphere – our annual cloud event – to 20 cities globally. What I heard from them boiled down to one simple idea: they’re looking for a better way to do things. Their employees want to work in collaborative environments without being tethered to their desks, and their IT departments are eager to shift resources from maintaining old technology to developing new ones.

These business leaders have experienced the power of living in the cloud and they want to bring that experience to the workplace. The cloud has certainly transformed my life by allowing my family to stay connected from all around the world. For example, at the São Paolo Atmosphere event, I joined a Google+ Hangout from my Android phone to wish my dad a happy birthday. This magic doesn’t need to be constrained to our personal lives. After all, we’re the same person at home and at work, and we like having access to the same devices and tools regardless.

A fundamental shift...
There was a time when business technology was at the forefront of innovation and productivity. Industries began to standardize around certain platforms that automated an individual’s work. But with complicated enterprise agreements, customer lock-in and limited competition, business technology lost its edge. IT professionals stopped innovating and relied on a handful of vendors who designed bloated software that was released every few years. At the same time, consumer technology took off. With the power of massive data centers, modern browsers and smart mobile devices at their fingertips, people found it easier than ever to communicate, create, and collaborate. Many people have fallen in love with the simplicity and freedom of these services, and they want to use them everywhere.

…to working in the future
This is where Google comes in. To provide a seamless transition from home to work (and back to home), we extended our popular consumer products–like Gmail and Google Drive–to meet the needs of businesses. For instance, Google Apps for Business provides an additional layer of enterprise features like delegated mailboxes, granular administrative controls, a 99.9% SLA, 24x7 support, migration tools, and an ecosystem of certified resellers.

We’ve also applied the same formula to other products that were born in the cloud: Google Maps Coordinate helps companies easily manage mobile workers; Chrome for Business gives you a consistent, personalized web experience on any device; Google App Engine lets you to build and host your own applications in the cloud; and Google Compute Engine allows you to rent Google’s infrastructure to operate at scale. With each of these offerings, you can access the latest innovation by clicking “refresh” in your browser.

We’re humbled that 5 million businesses (including BBVA and Roche), 66 of the top 100 U.S. universities, and government institutions in 45 of the 50 U.S. states have gone Google by choosing Google Apps to live and work in the cloud. We hear from these customers that alongside improving IT administration and individual productivity, Google Apps also helps teams of employees work better together. For example, Google documents let users collaborate in real-time and see each other’s edits as they happen. And now, with offline editing, users can continue working even without an internet connection.

As people have begun to embrace the cloud, some legacy enterprise vendors have started to offer their own cloud-labeled offerings. They claim to offer a bridge between legacy solutions and the cloud. But these offerings still rely on desktop products and on-premise servers, require heavy IT investment, have limited support for mobile devices, come with complicated pricing and licences–and ultimately they’re still focused on individual productivity. If anything, they offer a bridge to the past.

With the explosion of computing devices, ubiquitous high-speed internet, and mobile workforces, there’s a fundamental shift happening in business. The question is: do you want to cross a bridge to continue working in the past...or move to the cloud so you can live and work seamlessly in the future?

Get started with Google Apps or collaborate in real-time today with literary masters: Shakespeare, Nietzsche, Poe and more.
URL: http://googleenterprise.blogspot.com/2012/07/new-future-hitting-refresh-on-business.html

[G] Gmail log search feature enhances visibility for domain admins

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Official Google Enterprise Blog: Gmail log search feature enhances visibility for domain admins

Posted by Priya Mathew, Google Apps Senior Strategist

Google Apps domain admins have access to a new tool – Gmail log search – that increases visibility into their email traffic. This feature in the Apps control panel allows domain admins to search through the Gmail delivery logs to investigate email delivery and traffic questions. Many domain admins have requested a self-service tool like this, and Gmail log search will make it easier to answer questions like: What happened to an inbound or outbound message? Was a message sent to my domain and marked as spam? Which users sent or received a specific message?

The information that is available in the log search feature includes:
  • Basic message information like Sender, Recipient, Subject, Date and Message-ID
  • Attachment size
  • Total transit time
  • Delivery status

This Gmail log search feature was built using Google BigQuery, a Google Cloud Platform product that allows developers to store and query large amounts of data. We chose BigQuery because it can analyze multi-terabyte data sets with billions of headers to deliver precise results in just a few seconds. Gmail log search will help domain admins have the same type of visibility into the operations of Google Apps that they are used to from the legacy, on-premise email systems.

Gmail log search will be available starting today to Google Apps for Business, Education and Government customers, and will roll out to all domains over the next few weeks. Learn more about the feature in the Google Apps Help Center.
URL: http://googleenterprise.blogspot.com/2012/07/gmail-log-search-feature-enhances.html

[G] Breaking Borders for Free Expression

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Google Public Policy Blog: Breaking Borders for Free Expression

Posted by Bob Boorstin, Director, Global Policy 

Today in Nairobi, at the biannual Global Voices Citizen Media summit, Google and the group Global Voices announced the winners of the 2nd Breaking Borders Award. The award honors people who, in the view of Global Voices, are making a difference in the push for a free and open Internet.

The 2012 winners were selected by the board of Global Voices, and come from two regions in the world where free speech is often threatened — North Africa and Central Europe.

In Morocco, Mamfakinch has become far and away the most popular Moroccan citizen media portal. The name means "we don't give up" in that nation's Arabic dialect. Mamfakinch uses volunteer editors to aggregate and curate materials from its contributors. In less than a year, the site grew from a "crazy idea" to a site with more than one million unique visitors.

The other award winner was Budapest-based Atlatszo.hu. Global Voices cited its work in supporting press freedom in Hungary in the wake of the passage of a new, controversial media law. Atlatszo.hu has worked to maintain standards of journalistic integrity and quality investigative journalism. The group, led by Marietta Le, recently fought and won an important fight for the protection of sources in Hungary.

We are proud to support Global Voices and the work they do to recognize and empower citizens’ media around the world.
URL: http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.com/2012/07/breaking-borders-for-free-expression.html

[G] The web is working for American businesses

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Google Public Policy Blog: The web is working for American businesses

Posted by Margo Georgiadis, VP, Americas Sales

The web is where we go to find things—that somewhere special to eat tonight, the directions to guide us there and suggestions for that one-of-a-kind present for the birthday girl. Ninety-seven percent of Americans are looking online for local goods and services using their computers and mobile devices.

The growth of our Internet use has naturally helped the ecommerce industry to expand rapidly over the past decade. But the web is also positively impacting brick-and-mortar businesses. According to Boston Consulting Group, American consumers who researched products online last year spent almost $2,000 actually purchasing those products offline. That’s almost $500 billion that went directly to main street retail. All in all, it’s clear that the economic impact of the web is huge; the Internet is where business is done and jobs are created.

We’re proud to be part of such a dynamic industry, and we’re committed to helping make the web work for American businesses. Through our search and advertising programs, businesses find customers, publishers earn money from their content and nonprofits solicit donations and volunteers. These tools are how Google makes money, and they’re how millions of other businesses do, too.

In fact, in 2011, Google’s search and advertising tools helped provide $80 billion of economic activity for 1.8 million advertisers, website publishers and nonprofits across the U.S. You can see the state-by-state breakdown on our economic impact website.

Take one example: King Arthur Flour, a great New England baking company. King Arthur has been a well-known local company since George Washington was President, but has recently used the web to grow into an internationally-renowned baking business. Similarly, Nebraska’s 80 year-old Oriental Trading Company shifted some of its catalog-based marketing to the web, and now sells 80 percent of their toys and novelties online. Or consider New Jersey’s Bornstein Sons home maintenance and repair contracting business, which was founded 70 years ago and recently began to advertise online. They now get one in four of their new customers from the web.

These are just a few examples out of the hundreds of thousands of businesses who are growing and hiring thanks to the web. And Google is committed to getting even more businesses online. Over the past year, we’ve been traveling the country with our Get Your Business Online program, encouraging businesses throughout the U.S. to create free websites and reach more customers. So far, we’ve worked with thousands of businesses to launch their new websites.

It’s a fact that the Internet is creating jobs and helping the American economy grow. And we’re proud to be a part of that process.

URL: http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.com/2012/07/web-is-working-for-american-businesses.html

[G] GoogleServe 2012: More skills-based service

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Official Google Blog: GoogleServe 2012: More skills-based service

This year we celebrated our fifth GoogleServe Global Week of Service—an annual tradition in which Googlers around the world join together in community service projects. Volunteering together helps to revitalize and strengthen our connections with the cities and towns in which we live and work, and also brings us closer together as a global team.

In the past we’ve done hundreds of projects that address local community needs and engage our hearts and hands. This year, inspired by Billion+ Change and Reimagining Service as well as industry research, we focused on incorporating more skills-based projects. Our goal is to use our professional skills to generate more value for the communities we serve and to give Googlers an opportunity to have an even more impactful and fulfilling volunteer experience.

With that in mind, our software engineers developed code to help make math formulas accessible to blind students with Social Coding 4 Good; with the Student Veterans of America recruiters led resume and interviewing skills workshops with veterans; and with the Branson Centre in South Africa sales and business development professionals trained entrepreneurs in online tools to grow and optimize their small businesses.

Overall, more than 5,000 Googlers helped serve their communities across 400+ different projects as part of GoogleServe this year. Here’s a sampling of some of the other projects we participated in:

See our Life at Google page for photos of some of our employees and partners in action. While we do set aside a week to focus on serving the communities in which we work and live, giving back is an ongoing effort here at Google. If you'd like to join us in using your skills for social good, check out All for Good, for opportunities to give back in your community year-round.


Posted by Seth Marbin, on behalf of the GoogleServe and Googler Social Responsibility Teams
URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/07/googleserve-2012-more-skills-based.html

[G] Our unique approach to research

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Official Google Blog: Our unique approach to research

Google started as a research project—and research has remained a core part of our culture. But we also do research differently than many other places. To shed more light on Google’s unique approach to research, Peter Norvig (Director of Research), Slav Petrov (Senior Research Scientist) and I recently published a paper, “Google’s Hybrid Approach to Research,” in the July issue of Communications of the ACM.



In the paper, we describe our hybrid approach to research, which integrates research and development to maximize our impact on users and the speed at which we make progress. Our model allows us to work at unparalleled scale and conduct research in vivo on real systems with millions of users, rather than on artificial prototypes. This yields not only innovative research results and new technologies, but valuable new capabilities for the company—think of MapReduce, Voice Search or open source projects such as Android and Chrome.

Breaking up long-term research projects into shorter-term, measurable components is another aspect of our integrated model. This is not to say our model precludes longer-term objectives, but we try to achieve these in stages. For example, Google Translate is a multi-year project characterized by the need for both research and complex systems, but we’ve achieved many small objectives along the way—such as adding languages over time for a current total of 64, developing features like two-step translation functionality, enabling users to make corrections, and consideration of syntactic structure.

Overall, our success in the areas of systems, speech recognition, language translation, machine learning, market algorithms, computer vision and many other areas has stemmed from our hybrid research approach. While there are risks associated with the close integration of research and development activities—namely the concern that research will take a back seat in favor of shorter-term projects—we mitigate those by focusing on the user and empirical data, maintaining a flexible organizational structure, and engaging with the academic community. We have a portfolio of timescales, with some researchers working with engineers to rapidly iterate on existing products, and others working on forward-looking projects that will benefit people in the future.

We hope “Google’s Hybrid Approach to Research” helps explain our method. We feel it will bring some clarification and transparency to our approach, and perhaps merit consideration by other technology companies and academic labs that organize research differently.

To learn more about what we do and see see real-time applications of our hybrid research model, add Research at Google to your circles on Google+.

Posted by Alfred Spector, Vice President of Research and Special Initiatives
URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/07/our-unique-approach-to-research.html

Monday, July 2, 2012

[G] Our Unique Approach to Research

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Google Research Blog: Our Unique Approach to Research

Posted by Alfred Spector, Vice President of Research and Special Initiatives




Google started as a research project—and research has remained a core part of our culture. But we also do research differently than many other places. To shed more light on Google’s unique approach to research, Peter Norvig (Director of Research), Slav Petrov (Senior Research Scientist) and I recently published a paper, “Google’s Hybrid Approach to Research,” in the July issue of Communications of the ACM.


 

 


In the paper, we describe our hybrid approach to research, which integrates research and development to maximize our impact on users and the speed at which we make progress. Our model allows us to work at unparalleled scale and conduct research in vivo on real systems with millions of users, rather than on artificial prototypes. This yields not only innovative research results and new technologies, but valuable new capabilities for the company—think of MapReduce, Voice Search or open source projects such as Android and Chrome. 



Breaking up long-term research projects into shorter-term, measurable components is another aspect of our integrated model. This is not to say our model precludes longer-term objectives, but we try to achieve these in stages. For example, Google Translate is a multi-year project characterized by the need for both research and complex systems, but we’ve achieved many small objectives along the way—such as adding languages over time for a current total of 64, developing features like two-step translation functionality, enabling users to make corrections, and consideration of syntactic structure.



Overall, our success in the areas of systems, speech recognition, language translation, machine learning, market algorithms, computer vision and many other areas has stemmed from our hybrid research approach. While there are risks associated with the close integration of research and development activities—namely the concern that research will take a back seat in favor of shorter-term projects—we mitigate those by focusing on the user and empirical data, maintaining a flexible organizational structure, and engaging with the academic community. We have a portfolio of timescales, with some researchers working with engineers to rapidly iterate on existing products, and others working on forward-looking projects that will benefit people in the future.



We hope “Google’s Hybrid Approach to Research” helps explain our method. We feel it will bring some clarification and transparency to our approach, and perhaps merit consideration by other technology companies and academic labs that organize research differently.



To learn more about what we do and see see real-time applications of our hybrid research model, add Research at Google to your circles on Google+.



(Cross-posted on the Official Google Blog


URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/gJZg/~3/-c6wa4nAbx8/our-unique-approach-to-research.html

[G] More control with “mute this ad” [x] icon

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Inside AdSense: More control with “mute this ad” [x] icon


We’re investing in many ways to give users control over the ads they see. On YouTube, our TrueView ad product enables users to skip video ads. On Google search, you can click “Why this Ad?” and stop sites you’re not interested in from showing you ads. Our Ads Preferences Manager, available with one click on the AdChoices icon on ads on the Google Display Network, enables you as a consumer to edit your interest categories, or opt out of all interest-based ads including remarketing ads on our Display Network.



Over the next few weeks, we’re introducing a small [x] which will appear in the corner of some display ads on the Google Display Network. When a user clicks the [x], he or she will no longer see ads from that campaign. We’re starting by showing the [x] in ads that are based on remarketing and interest categories.





Users who click the [x] on an ad will be shown a confirmation page explaining that the advertisement has been muted, along with a link to the Ad Preferences Manager. The feedback this provides will also help improve our ads over time.



The muting is not a 100% guarantee you won’t see that ad again as a consumer -- for example, the same ad could be shown by a different ad company, or the marketer could run a separate campaign targeting specific web content.  But we believe it’s an early step in the right direction of giving users control over ads, while helping marketers and websites deliver ads that perform better.



We believe this early-look feature can bring benefits to the entire ecosystem: users have a way to control their experience and signal that they aren’t interested in certain ads; advertisers are no longer paying to show ads to people who aren’t interested; and publishers will receive better performing (and potentially more valuable) ads, and spend less time filtering out ads they think won’t be of interest to their audience.



Online advertising underpins the web and supports millions of businesses. It’s already unique in the level of control it can offer users. We’re at the early stages of these innovations, with much more to come in months and years ahead.



Posted by -- Michael Aiello, Product Manager


URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/tuAm/~3/QxtPiqL9Eiw/more-control-with-mute-this-ad-x-icon.html

[G] The web is working for American businesses

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Official Google Blog: The web is working for American businesses

The web is where we go to find things—that somewhere special to eat tonight, the directions to guide us there and suggestions for that one-of-a-kind present for the birthday girl. Ninety-seven percent of Americans are looking online for local goods and services using their computers and mobile devices.

The growth of our Internet use has naturally helped the ecommerce industry to expand rapidly over the past decade. But the web is also positively impacting brick-and-mortar businesses. According to Boston Consulting Group, American consumers who researched products online last year spent almost $2,000 actually purchasing those products offline. That’s almost $500 billion that went directly to main street retail. All in all, it’s clear that the economic impact of the web is huge; the Internet is where business is done and jobs are created.

We’re proud to be part of such a dynamic industry, and we’re committed to helping make the web work for American businesses. Through our search and advertising programs, businesses find customers, publishers earn money from their content and nonprofits solicit donations and volunteers. These tools are how Google makes money, and they’re how millions of other businesses do, too.

In fact, in 2011, Google’s search and advertising tools helped provide $80 billion of economic activity for 1.8 million advertisers, website publishers and nonprofits across the U.S. You can see the state-by-state breakdown on our economic impact website.

Take one example: King Arthur Flour, a great New England baking company. King Arthur has been a well-known local company since George Washington was President, but has recently used the web to grow into an internationally-renowned baking business. Similarly, Nebraska’s 80 year-old Oriental Trading Company shifted some of its catalog-based marketing to the web, and now sells 80 percent of their toys and novelties online. Or consider New Jersey’s Bornstein Sons home maintenance and repair contracting business, which was founded 70 years ago and recently began to advertise online. They now get one in four of their new customers from the web.

These are just a few examples out of the hundreds of thousands of businesses who are growing and hiring thanks to the web. And Google is committed to getting even more businesses online. Over the past year, we’ve been traveling the country with our Get Your Business Online program, encouraging businesses throughout the U.S. to create free websites and reach more customers. So far, we’ve worked with thousands of businesses to launch their new websites.

It’s a fact that the Internet is creating jobs and helping the American economy grow. And we’re proud to be a part of that process.

Posted by Margo Georgiadis, VP, Americas Sales
URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/07/web-is-working-for-american-businesses.html