Friday, August 3, 2007

Introducing AdWords Editor 4.0 for Windows

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Introducing AdWords Editor 4.0 for Windows

Today we released version 4.0 of AdWords Editor, our free, downloadable campaign management application. Version 4.0 includes support for mobile ads, the ability to post changes to selected campaigns, custom date ranges for performance statistics, and the ability to update negative keywords along with your regular keywords. You can read the release notes for a list of all the changes in version 4.0.

With the release of version 4.0, AdWords Editor is now available in 23 languages. The six new languages for version 4.0 are: Czech, Hebrew, Polish, Portuguese (Portugal), English (Australia), and Turkish.

If you haven't yet downloaded AdWords Editor, visit the AdWords Editor website to get the latest version. If you're already using AdWords Editor, you'll be prompted to upgrade automatically. To avoid losing unposted changes or comments, we suggest exporting an archive of your account before upgrading. After you've completed the upgrade, you just need to download your account and import the archive file to get your account up and running.

We encourage you to upgrade to version 4.0 within the next two weeks to avoid potential technical problems that might prevent older versions from being fully functional. While this release is for Windows only, version 4.0 will be available for Macs in the near future.

URL: http://adwords.blogspot.com/2007/08/introducing-adwords-editor-40-for.html

Some great Gmail video responses!

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Some great Gmail video responses!



Since we posted about our collaborative Gmail video project last week, we've gotten a lot of excellent submissions from around the world, and we wanted to share some of them with you here. I couldn't have imagined some of the ideas you've come up with, and they're going to make for a great final video. Here are just a few of the coolest clips made so far:


One of the first entries we got, from Taiwan:



Here's one that took some serious imagination:


Lightning mail:


Lego animation!


Gmail, the underwater edition:


X-ray Gmail:


Lots of people involved their kids. Here's a father and daughter from Spain:



You can see all of the responses here and learn how to submit your own clip at http://mail.google.com/mvideo. Remember, you can submit clips until August 13th.

URL: http://gmailblog.blogspot.com/2007/08/some-great-gmail-video-responses.html

Google Conversion University Attendees: Thank You!

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Google Conversion University Attendees: Thank You!

This past Wednesday, we hosted our first ever Google Conversion University event. Over 100 participants from across the country visited the Googleplex for a day to gain insights into using Google Analytics, Website Optimizer, and AdWords. To everyone who attended: Thank you for making the event so much fun and for sharing your ideas and experiences with us. We sincerely hope that you left inspired and more knowledgeable than you arrived. (We also hope that you enjoy your T-shirt and Avinash Kaushik's new book!)

So, what was covered? Brett Crosby opened the day by providing some perspective on the evolution and direction of Google Analytics. Avinash Kaushik presented "Successful Web Analytics Approaches" and "Creating Data Driven Cultures". Stephanie Hsu spoke about using Google Analytics to optimize your AdWords campaigns and Alex Ortiz explained how to track rich interactive web experiences. In "Optimizing Customer Experiences", Tom Leung described how to implement a variety of testing scenarios using Website Optimizer. Jeff Gillis presented on the spectrum of the Google Analytics product ecosystem including how to track offline and radio advertising.

But perhaps most interesting of all were the "Ask the Team", Lab, and Q & A sessions. We were able to hear your thoughts, challenges, and ideas and renew our focus on making Google Analytics even better.

Those of you who weren't able to attend will get another chance. Our plan is to make Google Conversion University available to as many website owners and advertisers as we can. We'll keep you posted.

URL: http://analytics.blogspot.com/2007/08/google-conversion-university-attendees.html

Peek-a-boo, I see you (on this spreadsheet)

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: Peek-a-boo, I see you (on this spreadsheet)



As we mentioned in the Docs & Spreadsheets help group last week, we added a few cool (in my opinion ;) features to the collaborative spreadsheets editor. What we didn't mention was the hard work of a few interns which led to these features.

Matt Ziegelbaum gave us the new Sortbar, which is a huge improvement to our old Sort tab. It's that new gray bar you'll see towards the top of your spreadsheets. You can drag and drop the handle at the left to quickly and easily freeze your header rows, but it also gives you one-click access to sorting. Just click it once above the column you want to sort; click again to reverse the sort.

James Walker gave us the collaborator location indicators. This one adds even more "wow" to the Real-time collaboration capabilities of the product. When you are working in the same spreadsheet with other people, you can now see where they are - as their selected cell will be highlighted with a colored box. If you don't see them, just click their name in the discuss tab and you'll be taken to the part of the spreadsheet where they are working and watch, in real-time, as they move around the sheet. You'll also be given a visual indicator when a cell is being edited (it turns gray) to help avoid those "oops - I think i just edited the same cell as you" moments. If you've never actually edited a spreadsheet at the same time as other people, go create a spreadsheet of your favorite videos or musicians and invite a few people to give their ratings... or whatever. Real-time collaboration might change your perspective on productivity... and fun!

If anyone ever tells you that interns do un-important tasks and get coffee for their managers - don't believe it. In fact, I'm going now to get coffee for James and Matt and the rest of the team who helped get these features done!

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2007/08/peek-boo-i-see-you-on-this-spreadsheet.html

Thursday, August 2, 2007

Weekly Google Code Roundup for July 30th to August 3nd

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Google Code - Updates: Weekly Google Code Roundup for July 30th to August 3nd



It feels like summer started a blink of an eye ago but we have reached August already. The summer months tend to be slower, but it doesn't seem to be the case so far at Google.

In API and developer-product news...

Create calendars with the Google Calendar Data API.

The Google Calendar data API now supports two new read/write feeds that allow you to manage a user's list of calendars. One feed lets you create and delete calendars, while the second feed can be used to add and remove subscriptions to existing calendars.

New API: It Slices! It Dices! It Uploads Your Docs!

Not only can you create new calendars, but you can create, import, and manage your Google Docs and Spreadsheets.

Google Mashup Editor, built with GWT

The Google Mashup Editor is a high profile, complex application that was written with GWT. Rich Burdon of the GME team discusses the rationale behind the GWT tool choice.

Looking for somewhere in India, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, or Ireland? Just geocode it!

Over the past few weeks, we enabled geocoding in the API for India, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, and Ireland. That means there are potentially 1.1 billion more users that might now be able to locate themselves on your map - that's about 1/5 of the world's population. (Pamela utilized GoogleLookup functions in a google spreadsheet to do the calculations.)

Chris Schalk has a detailed article introducing the Google AJAX APIs. The articles does in depth on all things Ajax.

Around Google

Microformats in Google Maps

We're happy to announce that we are adding support for the hCard microformat to Google Maps results.

How long will it take at rush hour?

The Maps team has added estimated timing on directions depending on rush hour.

Computer science resources for academics

Because we know that between teaching, doing research and advising students, computer science educators are quite strapped for time, we've recently launched a site called Google Code for Educators. While you may have previously heard about our offerings for K-12 teachers, this new program is focused on CS topics at the university level, and lets us share the knowledge we've built up around things like distributed systems and AJAX programming. It's designed for university faculty to learn about new computer science topics and include them in their courses, as well as to help curious students learn on their own.

Featured Projects

The Google Singleton Detector, or GSD, is a tool which analyzes Java bytecode and detects our different types of global state, including singletons, hingletons, mingletons and fingletons.

GWT Ext allows you to Ext components from within your GWT applications.

Google Tech Talks

Open Source Speaker Series: SilverStripe CMS

Advanced Topics in Programming Languages: Java Puzzlers, Episode VI

Hardware/Software Hacking: Joining the Real and the Virtual

LLVM 2.0

View more tech talks.

Podcasts

Google Developer Podcast Episode Six: The Hibernate Shards Open Source Project

We got to discuss the newly open sourced Hibernate Shards project with two of the core team that worked on it.

The Toronto Connection

For our latest podcast, we spoke with four students who are working together on their Summer of Code projects. Three of the students attend the University of Toronto, but Jeff Balogh visited the university at the start of the program to do some project planning with David Cooper, so he's an honorary UT alumni; both David and Jeff are working with mentors from the Python Software Foundation.

URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2007/08/weekly-google-code-roundup-for-july.html

Minnesota Bridge Collapse

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Google LatLong: Minnesota Bridge Collapse



Yesterday the I-35W Bridge connecting Minneapolis and St. Paul collapsed during rush hour. Here are some user-created maps that we hope are useful to those affected by the tragedy:

35W Bridge - Photos, links to news articles, meeting point locations, contact information for nearby hospitals, and prayer service schedules.

Roads closures & detours - Traffic information such as closed lanes and exits.

More information can be found by searching for terms like "35W detour" within the user-created content on Google Maps.

Update: We have updated our driving directions to avoid the I-35W Bridge and to take into account other local road closures that have been enacted to help the flow of traffic. Our driving directions will now recommend the best alternative driving route in the face of these closures.

URL: http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/2007/08/minnesota-bridge-collapse.html

Google News for mobile

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Google News Blog: Google News for mobile



We launched Google News for mobile devices last year to bring you access to the news you want, whenever you want. You can search for and browse through your favorite news headlines, all optimized for viewing on a mobile phone. You can even customize the homepage to add news sections that you care about.

What I like to keep in mind, though, is not just how convenient Google News for mobile can be, but how essential. One of our engineers was recently traveling through Africa when he ran into a loyal Google News user. When the Googler asked the local if he knew that Google News was available on mobile, the local guy replied with a puzzled look: "Of course -- how else would you get to it?" Well put, since nearly 9% of the world accesses the Internet via a mobile device.

Since then, we've launched Google News for mobile in 20 countries and are working to make it available in many more - so stay tuned if your country isn't yet covered. If you're living in Brazil, Sweden and Norway, I hope you're enjoying any of these three most recently launched versions! And if you happen to be reading this and you're a publisher of mobile news content we haven't yet discovered, we'd love to hear from you.

URL: http://googlenewsblog.blogspot.com/2007/08/google-news-for-mobile.html

Server location, cross-linking, and Web 2.0 technology thoughts

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Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Server location, cross-linking, and Web 2.0 technology thoughts



Held on June 27th, Searchnomics 2007 gave us (Greg Grothaus and Shashi Thakur) a chance to meet webmasters and answer some of their questions. As we're both engineers focused on improving search quality, the feedback was extremely valuable. Here's our take on the conference and a recap of some of what we talked about there.

Shashi: While I've worked at Google for over a year, this was my first time speaking at a conference. I spoke on the "Search Engine Friendly Design" panel. The exchanges were hugely valuable, helping me grasp some of the concerns of webmasters. Greg and I thought it would be valuable to share our responses to a few questions:

Does location of server matter? I use a .com domain but my content is for customers in the UK.

In our understanding of web content, Google considers both the IP address and the top-level domain (e.g. .com, .co.uk). Because we attempt to serve geographically relevant content, we factor domains that have a regional significance. For example, ".co.uk " domains are likely very relevant for user queries originating from the UK. In the absence of a significant top-level domain, we often use the web server's IP address as an added hint in our understanding of content.

I have many different sites. Can I cross-link between them?

Before you begin cross-linking sites, consider the user's perspective and whether the crosslinks provide value. If the sites are related in business -- e.g., an auto manual site linking to an auto parts retail site, then it could make sense -- the links are organic and useful. Cross-linking between dozens or hundreds of sites, however, probably doesn't provide value, and I would not recommend it.


Greg: Like Shashi, this was also my first opportunity to speak at a conference as a Googler. It was refreshing to hear feedback from the people who use the software we work every day to perfect. The session also underscored the argument that we're just at the beginning of search and have a long way to go. I spoke on the subject of Web 2.0 technologies. It was clear that many people are intimidated by the challenges of building a Web 2.0 site with respect to search engines. We understand these concerns. You should expect see more feedback from us on this subject, both at conferences and through our blog.

Any special guidance for DHTML/AJAX/Flash documents?

It's important to make sure that content and navigation can be rendered/negotiated using only HTML. So long as the content and navigation are the same for search crawlers and end users, you're more than welcome to use advanced technologies such as Flash and/or Javascript to improve the user experience using a richer presentation. In "Best uses of Flash," we wrote in more detail about this, and are working on a post about AJAX technology.

URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2007/08/server-location-cross-linking-and-web.html

AdSense fits FixYa

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AdSense fits FixYa

As a technical support community website, FixYa.com helps people find the solutions and information they're looking for as quickly and as easily as possible. According to Yaniv Bar-Lev, FixYa's VP of user acquisition, this is why integrating AdSense into the site made so much sense. "Combining the contextual power of Google AdSense with our own user-generated content significantly improved the browsing experience, while helping us to easily monetize our complex site of over 700,000 products and several million web pages," he says.

With such a large site, Yaniv believes that the search capability of the site is an important element. "One of the most important things a user can do to help us provide better service is run a search for a problem or a product. The information gathered by the query allows us to quickly get the user to the information he or she was looking for," he comments. "However, it's always good to have a helping hand and provide external information from other sources, which is exactly what AdSense enabled us to do."

Yaniv recently began testing changes to the ad placements and formats on his search results pages. At the same time, he wanted to ensure a positive user experience with the ads on such an important section of his site. He found that by placing a 468x60 banner directly above the search results, an area of high focus for users, he was able to lift his revenue by 200%.

Before:



After:



Yaniv says that the key takeaway from this optimization is to continually test ideas and track the results. He also adds that "there's an added value in providing contextual ads in highly focused positions once you've gathered sufficient information on what the user is actually interested in, such as through a search query."

What's next for FixYa? "We are definitely going to continue working closely with AdSense to find new ways of improving monetization and service."

URL: http://adsense.blogspot.com/2007/08/adsense-fits-fixya.html

Google Developer Podcast Episode Six: The Hibernate Shards Open Source Project

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Google Code - Updates: Google Developer Podcast Episode Six: The Hibernate Shards Open Source Project




Max Ross and Maulik Shah were part of a core group that worked on the recently open sourced Hibernate Shards project.

In the podcast you will learn:
  • What sharding is and what it means in the world of Hibernate
  • How the word "shards" is common at Google (the equivalent of "smurf" in The Smurfs)
  • Why you would want to shard your data to give you increased scalable performance
  • How the Hibernate Shards project doesn't mess with the core APIs, allowing you to add sharding unobtrusively
  • What you need to think about if you want to shard your data, and how you can design a schema that has a dimension that is easily sharded. This includes designing without complex relationships.
  • How you could create a crazy project that shards data across multiple databases (as in, one mysql, one Oracle), but that would be crazy
  • The various strategies to define how you retrieve your objects across the distributed data store
  • How this compares with horizontal partitioning at the database level itself (e.g. new features in MySQL, PostgreSQL, and others)
  • And much, much more.
For more information check out the Hibernate Shards homepage and the Google Group for discussion.

The new release that was mentioned in the podcast just went live. Congratulations to the team.

Start listening now


You can download the episode directly, or subscribe to the show (click here for iTunes one-click subscribe).

URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2007/08/google-developer-podcast-episode-six.html

Enclosure: http://google-developer-podcast.googlecode.com/files/googledev006.mp3

Kirkland does the Ragnar Relay

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Kirkland does the Ragnar Relay



Go back in time with me to last Friday morning. It's 4:30 a.m. I am standing in a parking lot, watching 11 Googlers and friends adding finish decorating the mini-vans and loading coolers filled with Gatorade and snacks. We're planning to drive to Blaine (Washington) and then run 187 miles over two days, relay-style, along the coast, finishing on the south end of Whidbey island. In other words, this is the Ragnar Relay, an event that started in Utah 4 years ago, now in its first year in Washington State. Sounds crazy, huh? Fortunately, I'm working with people who consider no idea too outrageous -- not even the notion that running a multi-day relay would be "fun"!

For the next 30+ hours we're on the road, catching naps in mini-vans and exchange points, overcoming challenges of running through summer Washington heat (who knew?) and total darkness (aided by headlamps), enjoying the roads that take us through the farmland (hello, llamas and blueberries!) and near the coast (over Deception Pass just before sunrise). We're ignoring blisters, scrapes, sore knees and ankles to get over the next hill, and another one after, and another one -- where our van is waiting, full of good cheer and ice-cold water. Then we push even harder to get to the exchange point.

We get into Langley, our last town on the route, Saturday afternoon. We wait for the last runner at the finishing line, and cross it together -- tired, sore, and, astonishingly, ready to do it again next year. And that, dear readers, is the story of how some of us spent last weekend.

URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2007/08/kirkland-does-ragnar-relay.html

Wednesday, August 1, 2007

New Resource: AdWords Success Stories

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New Resource: AdWords Success Stories

If you're interested in learning more about how all types of advertisers use AdWords and other Google products to reach new customers and grow their businesses, we've got a new resource for you.

The recently launched AdWords Success Stories website features advertisers and their stories -- you'll find all kinds of businesses ranging from doggie daycare to real estate. Each featured advertiser will share their experiences on the path to AdWords success, provide you with some tips, and maybe even give a little inspiration.

If you have your own AdWords success story that you'd like to share, we encourage you to send it to us through the Submit a Story page. The next business we profile might be yours! Be sure to check back often as new stories will be added regularly.

URL: http://adwords.blogspot.com/2007/08/new-resource-adwords-success-stories.html

How long will it take at rush hour?

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Google LatLong: How long will it take at rush hour?



Let's say you want to leave from Berkeley to catch the sunset from the beach at Half Moon Bay, to relax on the sand and watch the sun sink into the Pacific. We all know Google Maps will tell you how to get there. Now it's better at helping you decide when to leave to catch your sunset on time. When you ask Google Maps for driving directions, the directions say "about 59 minutes". But they also say something new: "up to 1 hour 50 minutes in traffic".



Google Maps now lets you know how long a drive might take in rush-hour traffic, for a limited set of metropolitan areas. Of course, if there is an accident, the drive could take even longer. But more likely than not, your drive to Half Moon Bay will take between 59 minutes and 1 hour 50 minutes.

If sunset today is at 7:00, then you figure you'll catch the tail end of rush hour. You might try a different route to dodge traffic. Drag the blue line off the Bay Bridge and onto 880 instead. Now the estimate is "up to 1 hour 20 minutes in traffic" -- that sounds better.



So be sure to leave by about 5:40, bring some warm clothes for after sunset, and with luck, maybe you can catch a green flash.

URL: http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/2007/08/how-long-will-it-take-at-rush-hour.html

Tuesday, July 31, 2007

Google Apps goes global

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Google Apps goes global



Our mission is to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful." Note that twice in this eleven-word mission statement, we mention that this is a global effort, not just a problem we're solving only for English-speaking users in the U.S. That global focus is critical, because fully 65% of Internet users around the world speak a language other than English. In fact, the Internet's top 10 languages still only account for around 85% of users -- and the remaining 15% represents almost 200 million people.

As part of our broader effort to make Google accessible to more people in their native languages, we're announcing a number of updates for Google Apps, our customizable package of hosted communication and collaboration applications for businesses, schools, and other organizations. Several features and components previously available only to English users and administrators of Google Apps are now available in other languages, too. Here's a quick rundown of what's new for non-English speakers:
  • Google Apps Premier Edition for companies and organizations needing an uptime guarantee for email service, 10 gigabytes of email storage per user, integration APIs and multi-lingual telephone support for critical issues (support experts are available in English, French, Italian, German, Spanish and Dutch). Also, for a limited time, you can try Premier Edition for free for 30 days.
  • Google Apps Partner Edition for ISPs and portals that want to offer Gmail and other applications to their subscribers.
  • Google Docs & Spreadsheets, which lets Google Apps users create and collaborate in real time, right from their browsers.
  • The Start Page, a central place for Google Apps users to preview their inboxes, calendars and documents, access their organizations' essential content, and search the web.
  • A more user-friendly control panel interface for Google Apps administrators.
  • Mail migration tools for administrators who want to switch from a different email system (available with Premier and Education Editions only).
Not only are we adding these features to the languages Google Apps already supports; we're also rolling Google Apps out in six more languages. Here's the full list: French, Italian, German, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Turkish, Polish, Ukrainian, Czech, Russian, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Japanese, Korean, Brazilian Portuguese, Thai, Vietnamese, Arabic, Hebrew, Indonesian, Hungarian, UK English and US English.

URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/google-apps-goes-global.html

Google Finance in Canada - for real

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Google Finance in Canada - for real



Though it was noted a bit earlier, now we're really pleased to introduce Google Finance Canada, a localized version of Google Finance tailored specifically, as you might guess, for Canadian investors. Canadians are the second largest group of Google Finance users, and as a Canadian myself, I'm excited to see Canadian financial information presented in the familiar easy to use Google Finance format. This new edition includes:
  • Top financial news from Canadian sources
  • Search with a preference for Canadian companies
  • Front-page high level economic data from the Bank of Canada
  • Portfolios in Canadian currency (or the currency of your choice)
  • Equity data from the Toronto Stock Exchange, TSX Venture Exchange, and Canadian mutual funds

In addition, stock quotes and charts for Canadian-listed companies are now available through the Google.com web search.

URL: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/google-finance-in-canada-for-real.html

And now in Canada

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Google Finance Blog: And now in Canada



Today we're pulling the wraps off Google Finance Canada, a localized version of Google Finance tailored for Canadian investors. One of our top requests has been for localized market information, presented of course in a useful and accessible format. We think Google Finance Canada addresses this by presenting top news and company news from Canadian sources, economic data from the Bank of Canada, multi-currency portfolios, and Canadian equity and mutual fund data. The main Google.com search experience has also been improved with Canadian stock onebox results. But speaking as a Canadian, my favourite feature is the company search that prioritizes Canadian companies (no more typing in Canadian exchange prefixes!).

What makes this release extra-special for us is the fact that it was put together by a distributed team of full-time and 20-percent-time engineers. (All the Google engineers may devote 20 percent of his or her work time towards a project of their own choosing.) We're grateful to have had the contributions of 20-percent engineers from our Hyderabad, Kirkland, Montreal, Mountain View, and New York offices to make this launch possible.

URL: http://googlefinanceblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/and-now-in-canada.html

Signs of real progress at the FCC

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Signs of real progress at the FCC



The Federal Communications Commission made real, if incomplete, progress for consumers this afternoon, as it set the rules for an upcoming auction of the publicly owned spectrum in the 700 MHz band.

None of us like how the current system locks you into wireless service plans that limit the kind of phone or PDA you can use, prevent you from downloading and using the software of your choice, and charge you hefty termination fees if you try to get out. And it's hard to ignore how the existing wireless carriers talk a good game about the virtues of the free market, but prefer to keep us stuck in their closed market. Today the FCC took some concrete steps on the road to bringing greater choice and competition to all Americans.

In essence, the FCC embraced two of the four openness conditions that we suggested several weeks ago: (1) open applications, the right of consumers to download and utilize any software applications or content they desire; and (2) open devices, the right of consumers to utilize their handheld communications device with whatever wireless network they prefer. We understand that the Commission also may have added real teeth to these two requirements, by plugging some of the more obvious loopholes and giving consumers a tangible remedy for any carrier violations.

Just two months ago, the notion that the FCC would take such a big step forward to give consumers meaningful choice through this auction seemed unlikely at best. Today -- thanks in no small part to broad public support for greater competition -- the FCC has embraced important principles of openness, and endorsed the unfettered workings of the free market for software applications and communications devices. Moreover, over the last few weeks several leading wireless carriers have reversed course and for the first time acknowledged our call for more open platforms in wireless networks. By any measure, that's real progress.

By the same token, it would have a more complete victory for consumers had the FCC adopted all four of the license conditions that we advocated, in order to pave the way for the real "third pipe" broadband competition that FCC Chairman Kevin Martin has been touting. For our part, we will need time to carefully study the actual text of the FCC's rules, due out in a few weeks, before we can make any definitive decisions about our possible participation in the auction.

In the meantime, we thank Chairman Martin for his leadership, and his compelling insight that American consumers deserve better in the wireless and broadband worlds. We've also had the pleasure of working on this issue with a broad cross-section of public interest groups that understand the need to foster more choices and competition in the wireless and broadband worlds.

URL: http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.com/2007/07/signs-of-real-progress-at-fcc.html

Supplemental goes mainstream

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Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Supplemental goes mainstream



When Google originally introduced Supplemental Results in 2003, our main web index had billions of web pages. The supplemental index made it possible to index even more web pages and, just like our main web index, make this content available when generating relevant search results for user queries. This was especially useful for queries that did not return many results from the main web index, and for these the supplemental index allowed us to query even more web pages. The fewer constraints we're able to place on sites we crawl for the supplemental index means that web pages that are not in the main web index could be included in the supplemental. These are often pages with lower PageRank or those with more complex URLs. Thus the supplemental index (read more - and here's Matt's talk about it on video) serves a very important purpose: to index as much of the relevant content that we crawl as possible.

The changes we make must focus on improving the search experience for our users. Since 2006, we've completely overhauled the system that crawls and indexes supplemental results. The current system provides deeper and more continuous indexing. Additionally, we are indexing URLs with more parameters and are continuing to place fewer restrictions on the sites we crawl. As a result, Supplemental Results are fresher and more comprehensive than ever. We're also working towards showing more Supplemental Results by ensuring that every query is able to search the supplemental index, and expect to roll this out over the course of the summer.

The distinction between the main and the supplemental index is therefore continuing to narrow. Given all the progress that we've been able to make so far, and thinking ahead to future improvements, we've decided to stop labeling these URLs as "Supplemental Results." Of course, you will continue to benefit from Google's supplemental index being deeper and fresher.

URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2007/07/supplemental-goes-mainstream.html

Health search

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Google Health Advertising Blog: Health search



We know consumers looking for health information turn to search engines -- but how do they decide what to click? Advertisers continue to try to understand how online users search and find health information. Jupiter Research's new US Health Consumer Study 2007 takes us one step closer to understanding how consumers search for health information. The study's overarching theme: relevance drives clicks. Four times as many consumers who used a search engine for health info clicked on a result because it was relevant, compared to others who click because the link was to a trusted source. And fully 65% of searchers clicked because the text was most relevant to their query. In addition, the study found that people seeking health information show no bias against sponsored results (versus natural results).

Based on this research, Jupiter recommends that advertisers leverage search engine optimization and paid search with a focus on content relevance. Advertisers should continue to optimize content for search engines.

How to use the new Search Query Performance report

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How to use the new Search Query Performance report

For those who haven't already noticed, we recently introduced the Search Query Performance report in the AdWords Report Center. This new report shows performance data for the search queries that triggered your ads that were clicked on to show. More importantly, this data can be used to gain a better understanding of how users are finding your ads and how they react to them.

Since the new report includes both search queries and the corresponding performance data, the report is commonly used to fine tune existing keyword lists. Specifically, you can use this report to identify both new keywords and negative keywords that you'd like to add to your account to better specify when you'd like your ad to appear.

Here's a quick example:
Say you're an online florist and you're working on adding some more keywords to your Anniversary campaign. Not a bad idea, since your campaign currently contains one ad group with the following keywords:

'anniversary'
'anniversary flowers'
'wedding anniversary flowers'

Rather than simply guessing which new keywords to add, you decide to first find out what users (a.k.a. potential customers) are searching on when they find and click on your anniversary-related ads today. To do so, you run a Search Query Performance report. Here's what your report looks like:

(Click the screen shot for a full-size image.)

Based on the data above, your ads are showing when users search on 'anniversary flowers,' but they're also appearing on these queries:

anniversary bouquet
anniversary gifts
anniversary centerpieces

The Search Query Match Type status for these queries is "broad." This means that keywords in your account that are similar to these queries are enabling your ads to be shown. Since 'anniversary bouquet' and 'anniversary gifts' are highly relevant to your product offering, you might consider adding them as keywords to this campaign. This will ensure that your ads will always show on these queries. Take it a step further, and create two new ad groups with ad text specific to gifts and bouquets.

If you don't want your ads showing on queries like 'anniversary centerpieces' because you sell bouquets and not arrangements, you might consider adding 'centerpieces' as a negative match keyword. However, keep in mind that users may find your ad relevant even if the query they used to find and click on your ad didn't correspond exactly to the product(s) advertised. For example, in the report above, you'll see that users who found your ad using the search query 'anniversary centerpieces' clicked on your ad and also converted on your website.

Finding new keywords and new negative keywords is just one way use this new report. You could also use it to:
  • Delete existing keywords and replace them with better targeted keywords
  • Create more tightly knit ad groups based on common groups of search queries
  • Ensure you've selected the correct match type (i.e. broad, phrase, exact, or negative) for existing keywords
Lastly, it's important to keep the following points in mind when analyzing a Search Query Performance report:
  • The report only includes queries for ads that were shown and clicked on
  • The report includes search network data only
  • Search query performance data is available from May 2, 2007 and onward
  • Search queries are different from keywords, so data from this report will most likely not match up to a Keyword Performance report or your Campaign Summary page
Instructions on how to run a Search Query Performance report can be found here. For more information on the new report, check out the AdWords Help Center.

URL: http://adwords.blogspot.com/2007/07/how-to-use-new-search-query-performance.html

Monday, July 30, 2007

Reporting Delay Update

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Reporting Delay Update

Update: 4:24pm Tuesday, 31 July -- Report data has been fully updated and is now current again. We apologize for any inconvenience the temporary delay caused and will have less reporting delays in the future.
_____________

We are starting to update reporting in all Google Analytics accounts affected by the delay. As of 5pm PST this evening, some users will start to see part or all of the data from the period between Saturday and now appear in reports. We expect updates for all accounts to continue through Monday night into tomorrow and will update this blog when reporting is fully restored.

Thank you for your patience.

URL: http://analytics.blogspot.com/2007/07/reporting-delay-update.html

Campaign Optimizer now available

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Campaign Optimizer now available

Today, we're happy to announce the launch of a new ad performance tool called Campaign Optimizer. It's an on-demand AdWords tool that provides personalized campaign ideas in just minutes. We're always looking for ways to help you improve your account performance and increase your advertising return, and we're excited that this tool can help jumpstart your optimization efforts. To start, click on the 'Optimize Campaign' link on the 'Campaign Summary' page, as shown in this screenshot below.

(Click the screenshot for a full-size image.)

Here's how Campaign Optimizer works: first, the tool analyzes your campaign to see what settings have or haven't worked well for you recently -- this process typically takes a minute or less. Next, it generates a customized proposal of ideas for your campaign aimed at improving your performance. Finally, you'll be able to review each proposed change and apply the ones you like directly to your campaign. As you can see in the screenshot below, it's easy to evaluate each change.

(Click the screenshot for a full-size image.)

Here are some of the ideas that Campaign Optimizer might propose to help improve your campaign's performance:
  • Change daily budget. Budget adjustments can affect your ad visibility and bring you more traffic.

  • Add new keywords. Campaign Optimizer proposes targeted keywords that relate to your landing page.

  • Change keyword matching options. The right matching option can help you reach customers more effectively.

  • Adjust keyword maximum cost-per-click bid. Your maximum CPC bid (in addition to your ad quality) affects your ad position.

  • Change ad text. Your ad text affects your click-through rate.

Since Campaign Optimizer is an automated tool, we suggest that it be the first step -- not the last -- in optimizing your account. You'll find that Campaign Optimizer is more effective on campaigns that have been running for at least two weeks. Use it to generate ideas and provide direction for your own optimization efforts. Once you've used Campaign Optimizer, you might review our optimization resources, as well as our previous posts on optimization tips for additional information on how to improve your account.

Try Campaign Optimizer now and let us know what you think by clicking on the feedback link on the right side of your Campaign Optimizer proposal.

URL: http://adwords.blogspot.com/2007/07/campaign-optimizer-now-available.html

Have a date with your favorite stock

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Have a date with your favorite stock



Want to know how your favorite stock is doing each day? Now you can! Google Calendar and Google Finance have teamed up to provide daily stock quotes.

Try searching for your favorite stock symbol in Calendar:



You will then be able to able to see the close price as an event each day.






URL: http://gmailblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/have-date-with-your-favorite-stock.html

Hide and go sort

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: Hide and go sort

Steven Saviano, Software Engineer, Google Docs & Spreadsheets

We've gotten an unprecedented amount of feedback since we launched the redesigned document list last month. As promised, we're considering all your suggestions -- positive and, ahem, "constructive." Today we've added two new features that topped your lists: sorting and hiding.
  • Sort your documents: Click on column headers to sort by document name, date changed, starred/unstarred and shared with. Click twice to change from ascending to descending order.
  • Hide is back: The archive feature is back, now called "hide." You'll notice a Hide button in the document list toolbar that will remove selected documents from view. You can always get back to hidden documents by selecting "Hidden" on the left. It's easy to unhide a document by selecting "Unhide" or simply dragging the document to a different folder.
As always, keep those suggestions coming in our help group.

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2007/07/hide-and-go-sort.html

Have a date with your favorite stock

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Google Finance Blog: Have a date with your favorite stock



Want to know how your favorite stock is doing each day? Now you can! Google Calendar and Google Finance have teamed up to provide daily stock quotes.

Try searching for your favorite stock symbol in Calendar:



You will then be able to able to see the close price as an event each day.

URL: http://googlefinanceblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/have-date-with-your-favorite-stock.html

Where in the world is... (Answers)

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Google LatLong: Where in the world is... (Answers)



Great detective work to everyone who was able to figure out what areas we updated! Here are some answers in case you weren't able to answer all of them.

Q:Two states known for their majestic peaks have gotten an upgrade.
A: Alaska was updated with new terrain and Colorado was updated with new imagery.

Q: I can now see where my favorite maple syrup is made.
A: Vermont was updated with new imagery.


Q:Certain Florida beaches (and 1 mountain) are looking much improved.
A: Orlando (Space Mountain), Daytona Beach, and Melbourne Florida were all updated with new imagery.


Q: Try counting the warthogs in the Boneyard.
A: I have yet to count them all, but check out Tuscon Arizona and try yourself!


Q: Peek inside the home of the Brew Crew.
A: Just outside Milwaukee, you can see Miller Park, home of the Brewers, with its retractable roof closing.


Q: You can read the Skin's logo painted on their field.
A: The Washington Redskins play right outside of Washington DC, at FedEx field.


Q: An historic state capitol building is now in high res.
A: Historic Charleston, West Virginia is now visible.


Q: This city was named after the Native American name of a nearby mountain, "Tacobet."
A: Tacoma, Washington is the name of the city.


Q: A "far away" city that played a key role in trans-Saharan trade can now be seen close up.
A: As the saying goes... "From here to Timbuktu"


Q:The town where Jane Austen spent her final years is much clearer.
A: Jane Austen spent her final years in Winchester, England.


Q: The topic of Vincent van Gogh's Cafe Terrace at Night is now bright as day.
A: This cafe is in Arles, France. It is now called Cafe Van Gogh (try searching for it in Google Earth).


Q:Take a look at "la ville noir," where Cointreau was invented.
A: Cointreau was invented in, and only distilled in, Angers, France.


Q: Only a third of this country's land is arable, but you can now view the entire country in high res.
A: Italy is now covered with SPOT 2.5m imagery.


Q: From 1880 to 1884 this German city was home to the world's tallest building.
A: Cologne is the city name you were searching for; the Washington Monument took the title from Cologne.


Q: Rockets may be used to disrupt rain clouds over this city next summer.
A: It is said that rockets will be used above the skies of Beijing to prevent rain during the 2008 Summer Olympics.


Q: This country received an impressive terrain update, you might call it Lord of the Terrain.
A: New Zealand has been updated with 10m terrain; the mountains are especially breathtaking.



For a more complete list of updates in this push, see the notes below.


New high resolution:
US: State of Vermont, State of Nevada, State of Colorado, Chenango County (NY),
Oswego County (NY), Lancaster (PA), Montgomery County (MD),
Prince George's County (MD), Charleston (WV), Frankfort (KY), Leon County (FL),
Volusia County (FL), Orlando (FL), Melbourne (FL), Ridgeland (MS), Tucson (AZ),
Phoenix (AZ), Pierce County (WA), Walworth County (WI), Waukesha County (WI),
Milwaukee (WI), Washington County (WI), Ozaukee County (WI), Puerto Rico &
US virgin Islands.

South America:
Maracaibo, Venezuela

France: French Riviera, Arles, Biaritz, Strasbourg, Grenoble, Angers, Amiens,
Bourges, Clermont Ferrand, Loire River

Italy: 2.5m imagery for the entire country.

Germany:
Aachen, Bielefeld, Braunschweig, Stralsund, Duisburg, Halle,
Hannover, Herten, Itzehoe, Karlsruhe, Cologne , Norderstedt, Pinneberg,
Quickborn, Recklinghausen, Rellingen, Schenefeld, Tornesch, Wentorf


Updated Imagery:
Americas: Regina, Canada; Saskatoon, Canada; Winnipeg, Canada;
Ottawa, Canada; Quebec, Canada; Chemung County (NY, US);
Cortland County (NY, US); Broward County (FL, US); Fairbanks (AK, US);
Boise (ID, US); Colorado Springs (CO, US); Aquas Calientes, Mexico;
Brasilia, Brazil; Santiago, Chile; San Salvador, El Salvador;
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

Europe: Lisbon, Portugal; Madrid, Spain; Naples, Italy; Rome, Italy; Athens, Greece;

Moscow, Russia;
St Petersburg, Russia; Kazan, Russia; Saratov, Russia; Prague,
Czech Republic


Middle East/Africa: Timbuktu, Mali; Cape Town, South Africa; Tunis, Tunisia; Tbilisi,
Georgia; Mecca, Saudi Arabia;
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; Riyadh, Saudi Arabia;
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Alger, Algeria; Lusaka, Zambia; Nouakchott, Mauritania; Sana, Yemen;
Tashkent, Uzbekistan;

Asia: Beijing, China;
Shanghai, China; Mumbai, India; Pyungyang, North Korea

Oceania: Melbourne, Australia;


Updated Terrain:
Eastern US 10m, West Virginia 3m, Alaska 60m, New Zealand 10m

URL: http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/2007/07/where-in-world-is-answers.html

The 700 MHz spectrum auction: where things stand

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The 700 MHz spectrum auction: where things stand



The upcoming FCC 700 MHz spectrum auction certainly has spurred both lively debate and, at times, heated rhetoric. With the FCC set to vote tomorrow on the rules for the auction, I thought it would be useful to summarize briefly where things stand at this point.

FCC Chairman Kevin Martin has stated from the beginning that his number one priority is to make broadband available to all Americans through a "third pipe" to the home (in addition to telephone and cable company broadband service). In support of that viewpoint, the Chairman has taken a bold stand for consumer choice by proposing that licensees must allow the use of any device or application on a specified portion of the 700 MHz spectrum. This approach -- if crafted with appropriately effective and enforceable provisions -- would free consumers from burdensome and artificial constraints on what they can do with their phones and software. These license conditions for the first time will enable device and applications competition at the "edges" of the wireless network.

Unfortunately, these same conditions fall well short of Chairman Martin's own goal of fostering the creation of a third pipe competitor. As long as incumbents are motivated by a desire to protect their current business models, and can continue to use a "blocking premium" to thwart fair market rates, they have every incentive to outbid would-be rivals. Such an auction outcome will constitute business as usual -- with no new broadband options in sight for consumers.

Google has joined numerous public interest groups and other Web companies in seeking more fundamental "wholesale open access" conditions. We believe these additional conditions would ensure that, no matter who wins the auction, consumers, along with service providers of all shapes and sizes, will have a seat at the table. We even committed to invest at least $4.6 billion in such a scenario, despite the fact that we have not traditionally been a communications company. Some have criticized us for, in their view, rigging the auction to our own benefit. We think quite the reverse is true: only by imposing certain openness conditions will potential new market entrants have a fair shot at successfully bidding in the auction.

Openness, user choice, and innovation have been elements fundamental to the rise and success of the Internet. We believe those same elements are critical for even the possibility of new broadband competition in the wireless space. If the FCC ultimately decides not to adopt "wholesale open access" license conditions, we do not see how significant new competition can emerge from this auction.

The time for debate is drawing to a close. The five FCC commissioners are this moment contemplating the relative merits of the parties' arguments, and are set to make a final decision on Tuesday morning. The prospects for fostering robust competition in this slender but valuable slice of spectrum hangs in the balance.

URL: http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.com/2007/07/700-mhz-spectrum-auction-where-things.html

Поздравления! Поздрав!

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Поздравления! Поздрав!

Two more languages -- Bulgarian and Serbian -- have just joined the AdSense for content family, and AdSense for search has also launched in Serbian. We know that web publishers in these regions have been waiting for for a long time -- thank you for your continued patience.

To get started with AdSense for content or AdSense for search, log in to your account and follow the wizard located under the AdSense Setup tab. If you don't have an account yet, you can sign-up for AdSense in just a few minutes.

If you have questions about using AdSense for content or AdSense for search, visit our Help Center or email us via our Contact Us form.

Keep working on your content and let it work for you!

URL: http://adsense.blogspot.com/2007/07/blog-post.html

Update: Temporary Reporting Delay since Saturday Night

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Update: Temporary Reporting Delay since Saturday Night

Google Analytics users,
There is a temporary reporting delay within Google Analytics accounts. For most accounts, reporting is current through this past Saturday night. Please note that no data will be lost - data will continue to be collected and processed during this time.

We are in the process of fully updating your Google Analytics account data and will display it within your reports as soon as possible. Please note, you are still able to log in to your accounts and access all the data through Saturday. We will update this blog when reporting is fully restored.

We apologize for any inconvenience this delay in reporting has caused.
Thank you for using Google Analytics.

URL: http://analytics.blogspot.com/2007/07/update-temporary-reporting-delay-since.html