Wednesday, December 20, 2006

[G] New Sidebars for All

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Inside Google Desktop: New Sidebars for All


Happy Holidays! Santa has delivered Google Desktop 4.5 in 27 more languages -- and the Japanese version is also coming out of beta. Now everyone can take advantage of new features, including:

Transparent Sidebar - The new Sidebar fits seamlessly with your desktop environment. Gadgets look right at home in the Sidebar and content-heavy gadgets are easier to tell apart with new frames and icons. And you can still have the Sidebar "Always on top," "not on top," or in "Auto-hide" mode.

Compatibility with the latest software - This new version is compatible with Microsoft Vista, Office 2007 and Mozilla Firefox 2.0.


The Google Desktop documentation and SDK have also been updated. It's easier than ever for first-time and experienced developers to create gadgets. We can't wait to see more of them!

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/12/new-sidebars-for-all.html

[G] Holiday Gadgets

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Inside Google Desktop: Holiday Gadgets



We've released some very fun and festive gadgets just in time for the holidays! Try these out:
Christmas Tree Christmas Tree by EK Chung and James Yum [USA]
A tree that you can decorate. Choose lights, bows, stockings, and ornaments for your tree to add distinctive holiday cheer.
Countdown to New Year Countdown to New Year by Teodor Filimon [Romania]
A winter calendar that shows how much time is left until January 1. This gadget's main purpose is to count down these final days of the year, so be sure to have it running New Year's Eve!
GXmas Tree GX'mas Tree by Lahiru Lakmal Priyadarshana [Sri Lanka]
A nice "Xmas" tree right on your desktop, with lights that reflect your CPU usage. Choose your favorite holiday song to play in the background.
Christmas Frame Christmas Frame by Bijoy Thangaraj [India]
A dynamic Christmas frame that plays a carol when you click on the tree!
Virtual Christmas Tree Virtual Christmas Tree by Catalin Avram [Romania]
A beautiful tree that you can decorate just like a real one. (Hint: Click the Ornaments box at the bottom of the tree, choose a decoration, and then click everywhere you want the decoration to appear.) You can also listen to carols, watch the snow fall, or shop for a holiday gift.

Many thanks to the talented developers of these fine gadgets. We encourage all of you to create and share yours for holidays you celebrate. To get started, visit our Developer Site and be sure to grab the Google Desktop SDK.

Happy Holidays from the Google Desktop Team!

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/12/holiday-gadgets.html

Why Chanute?

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Official Google Mac Blog: Why Chanute?

Posted by Dan Webb, Software Engineer, Google Earth for Mac OS X

If you're in the U.S. and you have a Mac, try this: Launch Google Earth, wait for the zooming to stop, and then press the + button to zoom closer. You'll arrive at the small town of Chanute, Kansas, nestled in the southeast corner of the state. I doubt you've ever noticed this before now. But even if you have, you're probably wondering -- why Chanute?

There are several reasons. The most important reason is that I was born and raised there. I grew up on a small farm, and while everyone else was out feeding the ducks and milking the cows, I was inside making electronic contraptions and eventually programming computers (which would scarcely be recognized as such today, since my first computer had only 256 bytes of memory and a dual hexadecimal LED display).

The second reason I chose Chanute is that it's near the geographic center of the 48 contiguous states. If I had been born in, say, New Hampshire, I never would have thought to tamper with the Google Earth coordinates.

And the last reason is that my co-worker Brian McClendon, who grew up in Lawrence, Kansas, had already positioned the Windows version of Google Earth (which shipped a few months earlier than the Mac version) at his hometown. I guess you could say that Brian's shenanigans inspired my own.

But the choice of Chanute is not without controversy. Because it's farther than Lawrence from the geographic center of the 48 states, and since (as of this writing) the satellite imagery at Chanute is not as crisp, it could be interpreted as a less user-friendly choice, which is not in keeping with the Macintosh tradition. But don't let that fool you -- the people in Chanute are as friendly as they come. Stop by sometime and say hello -- and be sure to tell them Dan sent you.

URL: http://googlemac.blogspot.com/2006/12/why-chanute.html

Thursday, December 14, 2006

Dwelling on the past

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Dwelling on the past

As a backend engineer, one of my favorite features of Google Reader is its ability to track the history of a feed over time. Reader takes a snapshot of feeds periodically and saves the content, so you can see posts that are days or weeks old. It's a neat way to read the web; in a way, it lets you look back in time. Combined with Reader's ability to track what you have and haven't read, you can safely jet off to Tahiti for a few weeks and never miss a post.

Ideally, though, you'd like to catch up on those posts in the order they were written. That's why we're releasing one of our most requested features: sorting by oldest-first. Now you can read those Lost episode summaries in the right order after you've shook the sand out of your shoes. It's available in the view settings menu, so you can select it only for the feeds or folders you prefer.

Careful observers will note that we've also added sort by auto to view settings. This nifty feature mixes feeds together according to posting frequency, so items from rarely-updated feeds (your friend's blog) show up higher than items from frequently-updated feeds like The New York Times. Look for this feature to evolve over time as we try to find other ways of highlighting the most interesting content in your feeds. Enjoy!

URL: http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2006/12/dwelling-on-past.html

Collaboration worldwide

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: Collaboration worldwide



Whether you're sitting in the same room, across campus, or in different countries, you can collaborate with others using Google Docs & Spreadsheets. If you're using the application, and you live outside the U.S. or you're working with people outside of the U.S., we'd love to hear from you about what you're up to. So far we've heard from authors, college students, dragstrip operators, police officers, and even fantasy baseball league members.

Post your story here in our Google Group and while you're at it, check out other stories as well.

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2006/12/collaboration-worldwide.html

Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Dragging and dropping

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: Dragging and dropping



Have you ever come across a link to a document on the web and wished you could open it directly with Google Docs & Spreadsheets? The process until now has been somewhat convoluted -- you needed to save the file to your desktop, then upload it to Google Docs & Spreadsheets. What a drag. Wouldn't it be nice to save a few steps, and turn that drag into drag-and-drop? Thanks to our friends on the Google Toolbar team, you can.

We just launched Google Toolbar 3 Beta for Firefox, and it includes some very cool features for Google Docs & Spreadsheets users. With those features enabled, you can open most popular file types in Google D&S.; Clicking a link to a file on a web page will open the document directly in your browser window. Even cooler, you can drag file icons from your desktop to your browser and have them automatically imported into D&S.; Once you've installed the beta, enable these features from the "Options" menu of your Toolbar.

Being able to drag and drop files directly has really streamlined my day. Maybe I can even use that free time to catch up on my holiday shopping. And since you asked, Google Docs & Spreadsheets is a handy way to manage your shopping lists!

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2006/12/dragging-and-dropping.html

Tuesday, December 12, 2006

Happy collaborating!

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Google Custom Search: Happy collaborating!



We've made several improvements to the Custom Search collaboration process. Starting today, you'll be able to communicate more easily with new volunteers for your Custom Search Engine -- you'll see the email addresses of new volunteers as well as approved contributors. It's important to note that this process works both ways -- i.e., if you volunteer to contribute to a search engine, your email address will also be visible to the creator of the search engine. To see the email addresses of contributors simply go to the "Collaboration" section of the "Control Panel" of your search engine and you will see a list of contributors emails there. You will also get email notification when your invitee accepts your invitation to contribute to your Custom Search Engine. Last but certainly not least, you can now also see the sites your contributors have added to your search engine. Visit the "Sites" tab in the "Control Panel" to see what work your contributors are doing. If you have several contributors, you'll have a drop-down menu to select which contributor you'd like to view. We hope you find these features useful in building and maintaining your CSEs.

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/12/happy-collaborating.html

Monday, December 11, 2006

A Passion for Music

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Official Google Mac Blog: A Passion for Music

Posted by Mark Dalrymple, Member of Technical Staff, Mac Team

After an orchestra rehearsal last month, some of us went to the local Eat-n-Park, a family restaurant chain here in western Pennsylvania. I was decked out in a traditional black Google T-shirt. After chatting with the waitress a bit, she asked about the shirt, and I said that I worked at Google. She said "Wow! It never occurred to me that people actually worked there."

Yes, indeed, real live people work here. And because we're real people, we have real interests. The most interesting programmers I've come across have also had serious passions outside the world of bits and bytes. Among the Googlers I know are a triathlete, an expert wordsmith, a rescue dog trainer, and an incredible black-and-white photographer.

My particular passion is music. I've been playing music of one kind or another since fourth grade, having floated into and out of dozens of groups, and I have played hundreds of performances over the years. I met my wife Sharlotte in a community orchestra in Northern Virginia. Since moving to the Pittsburgh area in 2000, we've joined two concert bands, one community orchestra, an on-again off-again woodwind quintet, and we sing in a church choir.

I started out my music career on trombone in elementary school and got to be a fairly decent player. In junior high school, my folks sent me to The Summer Arts Camp at Interlochen, an 8-week musical immersion experience where you perform 7 complete concerts. That's a fresh batch of music nearly every week! At Interlochen, I met the bassoon while I was counting hundreds of bars of rest during orchestra rehearsals. One week the group was doing the Berceuse and Finale from Stravinski's Firebird suite, which has an amazing bassoon part. At that point, I decided I wanted to play that thing. I had to play that thing. Luckily, my school had an instrument no one was using, so I glommed onto it and took some lessons. I've kept up with both instruments over the years, becoming a "doubler": that is, I play each of them well enough to not embarrass myself in public.

Sharlotte and I are very busy musically, especially during the holiday times. This month, we're slated to play a three-night run of a hometown Christmas musical, one orchestra concert, three community band benefit concerts, background music at a grocery store, background music for a dinner banquet, two church services, and we'll be demonstrating the double-reed family to the local middle school's seventh grade band. It's a crazy schedule, but we love it.

I'll leave you with two recordings. In the first, I'm performing "Bye Bye Blues", a bass trombone solo with the Westmoreland Symphonic Winds Jazz band. The other is Zephyrs (The West Winds), a quintet I'm in, playing the second movement of the woodwind quintet by Muczynski, which includes Sharlotte on oboe and me on bassoon. I hope you enjoy the music -- played by people!


URL: http://googlemac.blogspot.com/2006/12/passion-for-music.html

Sunday, December 10, 2006

[G] Developer doc updated (more to come!)

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Inside Google Desktop: Developer doc updated (more to come!)



Take a look at our updated developer documentation — pages aimed at anyone who uses the Google Desktop SDK. Of course, the new doc describes the API changes in our latest release, but we've made other changes, too. The top-level and gadget doc has been reorganized, looks more like other Google API doc, and has some new navigational aids such as simplified side links and hierarchical links at the top.

We're still working on the doc. One of our short-term plans is to post code examples, so you won't have to download the SDK to see some source code. Another is to post a tutorial that leads you through writing your first gadget.

If you miss the old doc — maybe we removed a mostly obsolete or confusing page that you still find useful — you can download an archived version. See Using the Gadget API for details.

What else should we do? Please post your suggestions to the Developer Forum.

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/12/developer-doc-updated-more-to-come.html

Wednesday, December 6, 2006

No more extra white space after search results

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Google Custom Search: No more extra white space after search results




Many of you have complained about the extra white space at the bottom of the Custom Search results hosted on your page. We've heard you, and have rolled out a fix for better integration between your search engine and the rest of your site.

Here are some examples of search results with extra white space:

sla
binary tree

And here they are with the fix:

sla
binary tree

This fix is now enabled by default on all Custom Search Engines. If you experience problems, you can revert to the old behavior by adding this line to your search results snippet:

var googleSearchResizeIframe = false;

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/12/no-more-extra-white-space-after-search.html

Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Young puppy, new tricks...

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: Young puppy, new tricks...



As a web application, Google Docs & Spreadsheets can do all sorts of neat things. Of course, easy sharing and collaborative editing are the most obvious benefits, but this young puppy is learning some new tricks (of course, I'll mention the two closest to my heart first ;-) ).

One is GoogleLookup, which attempts to answer your questions by using information from the web. You can use it for all kinds of party tricks, like looking up the population of New York City [=GoogleLookup("New York City", "population")] or when Google was founded [=googlelookup("google", "founded")]. Try it to see what other things you can look up. I'll warn you in advance, it's a bit addicting. If you mouse over the cell, you'll see links to the source pages where we found the data, so you can always check out the primary sources. And don't forget you can copy/paste (ctrl-c / ctrl-v) the formula to other cells to easily have a bunch of GoogleLookups in a sheet. Don't expect to change the world with this function, but have fun with it.

While GoogleLookup covers a little bit of everything, its sibling GoogleFinance focuses just on financial data from Google Finance. Using a similar syntax, you can look up the price of Google stock [=GoogleFinance("GOOG")] or the 52-week high of Apple [=GoogleFinance("AAPL", "HIGH52")]. And since stock prices tend to change more often than, say, the capital of California does, we update them in your spreadsheet automatically. So if you leave your portfolio spreadsheet open, you should see numbers get updated as you would on Google Finance itself. Of course, we also have the same 20-minute delay on financial data.

So as GoogleLookup and Google Finance let you pull data from the web into your spreadsheet, we've also make it easier to put your data back out onto the web by publishing it. If you go to the "Publish" tab at the upper-right of your spreadsheet, you can publish your entire spreadsheet (or just one sheet of it) so that other people can view it as HTML, PDF, or even as an Atom or RSS feed. You can finally share your spreadsheets with others without them having to sign in to their Google Account. And if you go to the "more publishing options" link, you'll find some other cool options (duh!).

Besides a few other handy small features, there's one more worth mentioning: revisions. If you (or one of your 'trusted collaborators') makes a mistake in a spreadsheet which our usually-friendly autosave feature picks up, you can go back to prior versions of your spreadsheet using the "Revisions" tab. That'll come in handy, I promise.

So have fun, and please let us know what you think by
making suggestions, or discussing these features with others.

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2006/11/young-puppy-new-tricks.html

Sunday, November 26, 2006

The scoop on the Global Warming Student Speakout

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: The scoop on the Global Warming Student Speakout




We're winding up our Global Warming Student Speakout project with a full-page ad in USA Today (11/27/06). This project was in many ways an experiment: can hundreds of students of all ages and from all around the world kick out ideas on combating global warming...in real-time...in record time...and do it online using Google Docs & Spreadsheets? The answer is a resounding YES, I am very happy to say.

We got super-positive feedback from the 80+ schools who participated in the project, and of course all the kids are excited that their schools and ideas will be in the spotlight in the ad. (I'm not sure what page the ad will be on...all I know is that it won't be in the sports section ;-} )  I'll be raiding my local newspaper stand to pick up all the issues I can carry back to the team first thing tomorrow AM!

Check out this example of one Romanian school's brainstorm results in a published Google document...complete with student artwork that complements the class' ideas. And here's a nice anecdote from (coincidentally) another Romanian teacher who organized her class' participation in the project:

"I must confess that they [the students] were extremely enthusiastic. They really liked the fact that they had to brainstorm during the classes and then edit the document on their computers at home. During the brainstorming, which was indeed a real "storm", they came up with a lot of ideas."
-- Ioana Pecheanu, a high school teacher at Vasile Alecsandri National College in Galati, Romania

Many thanks to all the participants in this fun and fruitful project. Please check out the full list of the students' top 50 ideas on the Google Educators site.

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2006/11/scoop-on-global-warming-student.html

Wednesday, November 22, 2006

Gotta getta gadget

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: Gotta getta gadget



A new Google Gadget featuring a short list of your most recently edited documents and spreadsheets has just arrived in the Google Personalized Homepage. Here's what it looks like:





Just the way we like it - simple and to the point. That said, we already have a few enhancements in the works, so please post a comment if you have an improvement idea to share with us.

Ah but first you have to use it! Click on the "Add it now" button below (you'll have to be signed into your Google Account).

Add to Google

And P.S. we wish all our U.S. users a very happy Thanksgiving!

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2006/11/gotta-getta-gadget.html

[G] More and more gadgets

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Inside Google Desktop: More and more gadgets



We hope you're liking the new Google Desktop Sidebar that we introduced last week, but we hope you like it even more with these great new gadgets:
  • NPR Now Playing - Are you a fan of NPR? Well, they've created a new gadget for you. You can keep the NPR Now Playing gadget in your Sidebar or on your desktop for easy access to NPR programming. You'll never be far from your favorite programs and you can start listening with just a push of the button.
  • Moon Phase - We have gadgets to tell you about the weather, but what about the phases of the moon? This latest gadget tells you where we are, lunar-phase-wise, on your desktop. Simply place this virtual moon anywhere you want and hover your mouse over it to get more details.
  • Wikipedia Search - For all those inquisitive minds out there, here's another great gadget. Whenever there's a topic you want to explore or just something you don't know about, theWikipedia search gadget lets you quickly search Wikipedia. It also shows results and suggestions while you type, and saves your recent searches for easy access.

And if you want to customize your Sidebar, there are several ways to do it. From the Sidebar options menu, you can turn off the "Always on Top" feature to allow it to go to the background (easily bring it to the front by pressing shift twice). Or select the "Auto-hide" feature from the same menu to hide the Sidebar off the screen when your mouse isn't near it. And just drag the edge of the Sidebar to adjust the width.

To find out more about what you can do with your Sidebar, check out our features page or visit the Google Gadgets page to find other new gadgets.

And by the way, have a happy Thanksgiving.

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/11/more-and-more-gadgets.html

Tuesday, November 21, 2006

Custom Search in your language

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Google Custom Search: Custom Search in your language




It has always been our goal to enable anyone, anywhere create a Custom Search Engine. We're pleased to announce that we're getting closer to that goal. As of today, you can now create a Custom Search Engine for most languages and if you choose, you can give preference to results from a certain country as well. Here's how it works:

For the time being, you have to go to http://google.com/coop/cse/ to create your search engine (in the future, we will have versions of CSE for each country). On the main CSE site, you will now however, have the option to specify the language for your Custom Search. The language you choose will set the language for the text on the search results page and give preference to results in that language. You can also choose 'All Languages' in which case the language associated with the user's browser will be used. If you want to give preference to search results from a particular domain, you can do so as pattern later on. If, for instance, you wanted your search results to only be from Japan, you would include *.jp as a pattern. (Please note the * is essential.) You can also choose to give preference to results from a certain country by changing your code to use the country specific google domain (e.g., such as google.ru or google.es as opposed to google.com). Please see http://google.com/coop/docs/cse/hosting.html for the details.

Caveats: If your search box is on a web page where the character encoding is not utf-8, you will need to specify the correct input encoding from the standard list. Support is in only for left-to-right languages, right-to-left languages such as Hebrew or Arabic are not supported at this time

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/11/custom-search-in-your-language.html

Friday, November 17, 2006

How-To Part 6: Search your chat files

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How-To Part 6: Search your chat files

Quick -- can you remember that restaurant your mom recommended or the joke that got three LOLs and a ROTFL? With chat archiving, you don't have to; you can find your chats in your Gmail account using the same search technology that powers Google.com. Watch this to learn about searching for, and finding, Google Talk chats.

Peter Adams
Online Operations Coordinator

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/how-to-part-6-search-your-chat-files.html

Thursday, November 16, 2006

How-To Part 5: File transfers

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How-To Part 5: File transfers

Sometimes, the sound of your friend's voice or the sight of a favorite smiley may not be enough; you might need to connect by sending along your writing portfolio, or a recording of duck calls, or a video of a guy throwing silly putty from the roof of a parking structure.

In the heat of the moment, we can't anticipate what files you may need to send. That's why you can send any file of any size and type, any time. For more on sending files through Google Talk, watch this.

Peter Adams
Online Operations Coordinator

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/how-to-part-5-file-transfers.html

Making it easier to specify entire domains

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Google Custom Search: Making it easier to specify entire domains




A number of you have asked for the ability to specify entire domains (such as all the hosts that are part of stanford.edu or all the sites under ca.gov) in your CSEs so that you can more easily build a comprehensive search engine. We listened to your feedback, and starting today you can specify such patterns in your index.

To illustrate the power of this new customization addition, we created a few interesting demo search engines for you to review.

One searches across all the US Department of Energy funded laboratories, which we're calling a National Labs Search Engine. Another one searches across all the Indian Institutes of Technology, which we've called the IIT Search Engine. Please note that these are not CSEs Google will be maintaining; rather, we wanted to show you some possible ways to use this new feature. We hope you find this new addition useful to your Custom Search efforts. Please continue to give us your feedback.

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/11/making-it-easier-to-specify-entire.html

Wednesday, November 15, 2006

New features are up

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: New features are up



We just released a couple of new features:

  • Document spellcheck in your language
This one has consistently been a top feature request for a looooong time, so we're really excited to have finished it. The document spellcheck now supports more than 30 languages, and we think it's a better quality spellcheck than our old one (it's the same one that Gmail uses, actually).

  • 2 new views of your docs & spreadsheets
For the folks out there who have LOTS of documents and spreadsheets, you can now choose to display only documents, or only spreadsheets. Check out these new "All Documents" and "All Spreadsheets" options from the green-highlighted Browse Docs & Spreadsheets drop-down menu.

As always, we'll be monitoring the discussion group and support email for your feedback.

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2006/11/new-features-are-up.html

How-To Part 4: Voicemail

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How-To Part 4: Voicemail

If your friend is away from his or her computer or not logged in to Google Talk at all, you can leave a voice message which will be converted to an MP3 file and sent to their email account. In fact, if you're too nervous to ask out that special friend via direct conversation or have any other reason to want to deliver a message in not-quite-real-time, you can send it directly to voicemail. Learn how by watching this video.

Peter Adams
Online Operations Coordinator

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/how-to-part-4-voicemail.html

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

How-To Part 3: Voice Calls

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How-To Part 3: Voice Calls

Eating cereal aside, nobody likes to hear snap, crackle and pop. When we built Google Talk, we focused on voice quality, and our users seem to notice and appreciate that. Whether you're calling your kid at school twenty minutes away or your friend traveling in Bulgaria, you'll get instantaneous communication that's as clear as someone talking to you in the same room.

This video will teach you how to start making your free voice calls.

Peter Adams
Online Operations Coordinator

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/how-to-part-3-voice-calls.html

[G] Check out the new Sidebar

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Inside Google Desktop: Check out the new Sidebar



The Google Desktop Sidebar has always been great at delivering content personalized to individual users, ever since it was introduced way back in the second version of Google Desktop. But we kept thinking: what's a better way to deliver this content? In later versions of Google Desktop we let gadgets float on the desktop. But the Sidebar was starting to get a bit jealous and we couldn't restrain it any longer, so now there's Google Desktop 4.5, featuring a Sidebar with a new look.

The new Sidebar is transparent, so it fits seamlessly with your desktop environment. Gadgets that fought for attention now look right at home, and content-heavy gadgets get new frames and icons that make it easier to tell them apart. All of this leads to a better place to find your email, news, feeds, stock prices, weather and other essential information. And this version is compatible with all of the latest software including Microsoft Vista, Office 2007 and Mozilla Firefox 2.0. So what are you waiting for? Try the new Sidebar in Google Desktop now.

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/11/check-out-new-sidebar.html

Monday, November 13, 2006

Tools to improve your Reader experience

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Tools to improve your Reader experience

As an engineer, one of the things that warms my heart is when users of my product become invested enough in it to want to extend it. I was very happy to see that Reader has begun to attract all sorts of hacks and add-ons that tweak the application to better suit the usage patterns of particular people. It's hard to make an interface that is everything to everyone, and add-ons like these are our best hope of making Reader the ideal feed aggregator for the largest number of people.

Here are a few add-ons that we've discovered recently:

Google Reader Notifier (Mac): This open-source application adds a menu-bar icon which keeps track of new items within your entire reading list or just for a particular tag (the latter is useful for people like me that are subscribed to a lot of feeds and want to know only when the important ones are updated). Troels Bay, the author, has been revving the application on a regular basis, and it's getting better and better.

Gordita: Reader has one-click starring and sharing of items, but you may want to do the same to pages outside of Reader. Gordita lets you create a bookmarklet that allows you to copy Reader items that interest you to del.icio.us, along with all the other items you've bookmarked over the Web.

Google Reader Optimized: This set of user styles maximizes the reading area. When you want to sit down and power through hundreds of items, you may find this compact, stripped-down interface preferable.

Controlling Google Reader with a Cell Phone : This add-on may be a bit out there, but in a nutshell it allows you to control Reader with your Bluetooth cellphone. Perhaps if used in combination with the full-screen style above, you can build your own Reader 10-foot user interface.

Reader Button for the Google Toolbar for Internet Explorer: If you use the Google Toolbar for Internet Explorer, this custom button gives you one-click access to Reader and notifies you of new items via a changing icon.

Updated at 11am with the Toolbar button.

URL: http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2006/11/tools-to-improve-your-reader.html

How-To Part 2: Block or remove contacts

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How-To Part 2: Block or remove contacts

While you're showing Google Talk to your manager, your dentist or your mother-in-law, you might want to add them to your Friends list. But however charming they might be, perhaps you don't want them to stay on your Friends list after the demo. Fortunately, removing a user from your Google Talk Friends list or blocking their ability to chat with you altogether is an easy way to tidy up your contacts without letting them know you've had a change of heart.

To learn how to block or remove someone on your friends list, watch this.

Peter Adams
Online Operations Coordinator

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/how-to-part-2-block-or-remove-contacts.html

Sunday, November 12, 2006

New CSE Role Models

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Google Custom Search: New CSE Role Models



You've given us some great feedback so far on the Custom Search Engine (CSE). In particular, many of you have requested more sophisticated examples of existing CSEs, so you can learn from and reference them. We agree that there's no better way to discover its potential than from many examples out there. In response to your requests, we've expanded our featured examples page. It's now filled with dozens of examples that showcase the powerful features of the Custom Search Engine. You can easily browse through a number of categories including Information, Technology, Culture, Lifestyle, Latest, and Google Picks.

This is our first pass at improving our list of example search engines. Moving forward, we plan to continually expand and improve these pages. In the meantime, stay tuned for more updates and keep the feedback coming. We're excited to work with you to make the Custom Search Engine an even more powerful tool.

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/11/new-cse-role-models.html

Friday, November 10, 2006

How-To Part 1: Adding Friends

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How-To Part 1: Adding Friends

Google Talk has been out for over a year now, and here on the support team we're pretty used to the bells and whistles that make it a special product. But we realize that many people are new not just to Google Talk, but to chatting online itself. So we're pleased to be rolling out a series of video tutorials that cover the basics.

Up first is adding friends. Most people are excited to hear that their Gmail contacts are automatically loaded into their Friends list, but it's also easy to add new people to chat and talk with. Check out the video and give it a try.

Peter Adams
Online Operations Coordinator

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/how-to-part-1-adding-friends.html

Wednesday, November 8, 2006

Teaching orkut to Talk

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Teaching orkut to Talk

Look who's talking now!

A few of us from the Google Talk and the orkut teams got together a while back and started teaching orkut how to talk. After all, orkut users are already a very social bunch -- so we thought they might enjoy talking to each other. Read more about the new feature on the Google Blog.

This is just one more milestone for making Google Talk easier for you to talk to anyone, anywhere, anytime.

Reza Behforooz
Software Engineer

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/teaching-orkut-to-talk.html

Specialized results in your search engine

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Google Custom Search: Specialized results in your search engine



Many of you have told us that it would be useful to be able to add Subscribed Links to your Custom Search Engines (CSEs). That way, you could include all sorts of real-time status data and helpful answers in your customized search results pages, and take advantage of the wide variety of special search features already available from otherSubscribed Links creators.

We thought that was a good idea too, so we implemented it. Now you can list the Subscribed Links you want to add in the XML specification of your CSE, and just like that, they'll appear in your customized search results. Our documentation tells you how and illustrates with an example.

Some special search features you can add this way include:

  1. Real-time flight status information from FlightStats or subway train times from TrainCheck.
  2. Article snippets from Wikipedia and Answers.com.
  3. News from Digg and IGN.
  4. Demographic information from CityTownInfo.

Browse our directory to get an idea of the things Subscribed Links can do to enhance your results. Or make your own and share your expertise with your own users and other CSE creators while you design the best results for queries in your domain of knowledge.

Last but not least, we also wanted to mention that a number of advanced Co-op users have requested the ability to download all their annotations, including those created using the Google Marker. You can now do so by going to the advanced tab of your control panel and get your annotations in XML or in a tab delimited format.

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/11/specialized-results-in-your-search.html

Monday, November 6, 2006

The search engine that could

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Google Custom Search: The search engine that could



Last week, Ethan Zuckerman wrote a great article explaining why Custom Search Engines would be so useful for communities such as the Global Voices network. He built a CSE to search over 3000 blogs from across the world. This is exactly the kind of application we built our platform for -- not just because of the scale of his search engine, but also the cause it serves and its collaborative approach. Unfortunately, as he explains in his article, queries on his search engine for some of the terms he's interested in didn't work very well.

After a week of some serious engineering, we believe we've made searching on Ethan's Custom Search Engine -- and all CSEs, for that matter -- much, much better. In particular, Ethan's search for Ghana, which originally returned only three results, now retrieves a much healthier number. All around, you should see much better performance in the quality of the search results.

The reason is fairly complex. Custom search engines are based on approximation algorithms that aim to search over the entire contents of the sites you specify. As with all approximations, there is always room for improvement. We're constantly working on our algorithms, and your search engines will continue to get better. If you see any anomalies or problems, please let us know. We want to hear from you about what is and is not working.

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/11/search-engine-that-could.html

Friday, November 3, 2006

Syndicate your Custom Search Engine

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Google Custom Search: Syndicate your Custom Search Engine



Since we introduced it last week, people have created many thousands of Custom Search Engines (CSEs). We all have our personal favorites (mine is the Costume Search Engine--for the name alone), but it's hard to keep track of urls like http://www.google.com/coop/cse?cx=005946352831473999820%3Aqdkicbyttxy. It's also tough to help users find and return to the search engine you painstakingly created. So now there are two new gadgets that make Custom Search Engines more easily accessible for your users and yourself.

The first gadget is for fans of your search engine. Help them access it from everywhere -- their Google personalized homepage, their desktops, or from wherever Google Gadgets are syndicated. This gadget is a small and simple search box for your CSE that we hope keeps users coming back to your site.

To help your users find your CSE gadget, add the Add to Google button to your site. You can add it more than once, and it probably makes sense to have one next to your search engine's search box. There are instructions for adding this button in the "Code" tab of your search engine's control panel. Once a user clicks the Add to Google button, they will have easy access to your CSE, and to your site if that's where you display the search results.

Here's what the gadget looks like for the Costume Search Engine:






If you want see how the Add to Google button works before putting one on your site, visit your CSE homepage on the Google Co-op site.

The second gadget helps you access and manage your own CSEs. We're calling it the Custom Search Console. You can add it now to your Google personalized homepage, or look for the Add to Google button at the bottom of your CSE management page.

The console provides an instantly-updated view of all your CSEs, complete with with links to their homepages, control panels, and a dedicated search box all crammed into a tiny-but-usable interface. This screenshot shows my Custom Search Console, including the Pet Rats Custom Search Engine I recently started building.


URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/11/syndicate-your-custom-search-engine.html

Thursday, November 2, 2006

The post-interview interview

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The post-interview interview

After I convinced Chris to star in our little intro video, he couldn't wait to turn the tables on me:

(click here to watch the post-interview interview)

Here are links to some recent interviews:

Also, some of you may have had trouble accessing your Reader account this morning. There was some flakiness at one of our datacenters , but the problem was resolved within an hour. Sorry for the inconvenience -- you can rest assured that we're constantly working to improve our reliability and performance.

URL: http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2006/11/post-interview-interview.html

Wednesday, November 1, 2006

Offline messages

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Offline messages

Tired of getting the old "did-not-receive-your-chat" error message every time a friend disconnects while you are writing? If so, you will be pleased to hear that we're making things a little bit better by turning on another top requested feature in Google Talk: offline messages.

As you'd expect, this enables you to send messages to Google Talk friends who are offline. The messages will be delivered to your friends the next time they sign in with Google Talk or a third-party client. And when they sign in to Gmail, offline messages will be displayed as unread messages in their inbox. In Gmail, offline messages can be searched and organized -- just like instant messages in your chat history.

Your Google Talk account needs to have a Gmail inbox with chat history enabled in order to receive offline messages, so make sure to turn it on now!

Jonas Lindberg
Software Engineer

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/11/offline-messages.html

It's all about Custom Search

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Google Custom Search: It's all about Custom Search



Welcome to the Google Custom Search blog. This is where we aim to share our news, along with your ideas and expertise -- whether you are a sole proprietor or part of an organization or business using our new Custom Search tool.

It's been a little more than a couple of months since Google Co-op made its debut, and just over a week since we launched the Custom Search Engine. It's really great to see how tens of thousands of people have already started contributing. The various Subscribed Links and the Custom Search Engines you can now see tell us a community is coming together to enhance the search experience for a growing information-hungry crowd.

We've been listening to your feedback, and we have responded directly to many of your questions via Google Groups (please keep the comments coming). This blog is another way to communicate with you and offer updates on new features and functionality, clarify any confusing bits, and in general keep you up to date on Co-op progress.

Bookmark this blog, or subscribe to the feed, and stay tuned.

URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2006/11/its-all-about-custom-search.html

Tuesday, October 31, 2006

A real treat

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Official Google Docs & Spreadsheets Blog: A real treat



Anyone who has ever helped to launch a new beta product knows that the team obsessively seeks out every article or review, wondering, "Will it be a TRICK or a TREAT?" Happily, we got a big treat last week when PC Magazine gave Google Docs & Spreadsheets 4 out of 5 stars.

The part I love best about that article is that it says we're "bug-free." Wow, a beta product that's bug-free! (That would be a first, wouldn't it?) If you ever run across what you think might be a bug in Google Docs & Spreadsheets, please first check out our searchable Help Group where outstandingly helpful users like Gill and ahab share their opinions and expertise with other folks, including those of us on the product development side. If you don't see the topic of the issue addressed there or in the Help Center, please contact our support team.

URL: http://google-d-s.blogspot.com/2006/10/real-treat.html

Monday, October 30, 2006

[G] Getting the most out of Google Desktop

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Inside Google Desktop: Getting the most out of Google Desktop



When we were designing Google Desktop, we knew that people would use it in different ways. It's been interesting to see just what you're doing with it. Legal Andrew points out that one way to improve your experience is to simply have the right set of gadgets in your Sidebar, so that, for example, the email gadget keeps you from having to switch constantly between Outlook and your other programs. At Lifehacker, Adam Pash points out that you can tweak Google Desktop to get it to do more of what you want. And Ionut Alex. Chitu came up with a list of 10 Great Uses For Google Desktop, including control panel replacement, browser cache, and file recovery.

If you haven't already, make sure to check out our features page to see the full list of what Google Desktop has to offer. Or if you have other ideas, share them with us.

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/10/getting-most-out-of-google-desktop.html

Friday, October 27, 2006

Bug swatting

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Bug swatting

Being an engineer isn't always about working on fun new features -- sometimes there are bugs that need to be fixed before anything else can happen. This is especially important in an application like Reader; if you use something every day, even small bugs can start to get very annoying. Here's what's been keeping the team busy this past week:

  • The shared items clip that you can embed on your site will not interfere with other JavaScript that may be running (sorry about that, Stephanie).
  • A confirmation message is now shown when coming in from the "Add to Google" page (this includes the feed subscribe functionality built into Firefox 2).
  • Searching for feeds using keywords now works in Opera.
  • The scrolling position is now always reset when moving between feeds or folders (meaning items won't inadvertently be marked as read if you're using scroll tracking in expanded view).
  • The "none" color scheme for publisher clips now works (no more creative workarounds required).
  • The email that we supply for sending shared tags to friends now contains the right link.
  • Using the "next" bookmarklet correctly marks all items as read when displaying an entire blog. (We had been overly aggressive here, and marking items as read into the future as well!)
  • Items from different feeds or folders are no longer mixed together when clicking between them quickly.
  • Keyboard shortcuts in Internet Explorer should continue to work after using "gt" or "gu" (the tag and subscription selectors).

Folder menuWe also snuck in a small feature with this release: when you subscribe to a feed, you'll get an "Add to a folder..." drop-down. This way, you can move that feed to a folder right there and then, without having to go to the settings screen.

URL: http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2006/10/bug-swatting.html

Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Tell us how you Talk

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Tell us how you Talk

We want to hear how you're using Google Talk -- and we're looking for everything from the practical to the wacky. As in: did Google Talk help you get a date? Has it it reduced the cost of your small business communications? Is it easier to keep in touch with folks outside the country? Or maybe you used Google Talk to sing karaoke along with your friends in Korea ... You get the idea.

So please, send us your story. If you're especially cutting-edge, try shooting your story on video, upload it to Google Video, and send us the Google Video URL via the same form. We'll post some of the most interesting stories on the Google Talk site. Watch for those soon.

Lewis Lin
Product Marketing Manager, Google Talk

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/10/tell-us-how-you-talk.html

Monday, October 9, 2006

[G] Helpful resources

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Inside Google Desktop: Helpful resources



With new versions of Google Desktop frequently being released, we've really been adding to the feature set. To help you navigate this maze of features and improve your experience with Desktop, here are two help resources you may want to check out.

U2U Groups

U2U (User to User) groups are official Google Groups that enable users to post feature requests, suggestions, bugs or problem reports, and general questions about Google products and services. What's unique about a U2U group is that not only do experienced users weigh in on your feedback, but an official Google presence, our very own Google Desktop Guide, regularly participates in the discussion. Expert feedback combined with the ability to search over all group posts provides a powerful resource. In addition to the Google Desktop Help and Enterprise U2U groups, groups are also available for other products like Toolbar, Picasa, Maps, Calendar, and more.

Help Center

We maintain a Google Desktop Help Center in 12 languages to help you use Google Desktop. You can browse the content or search the Knowledge Base to find an answer to your inquiry. If you're unable to find your answer on the Help Center or the U2U group, or you would like to leave us feedback or suggestions privately, you can, through the Help Center.

And if you have questions about other Google products and services, bookmark the general Google Help portal: http://www.google.com/support

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/10/helpful-resources.html

We made it (a little bit) better

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We made it (a little bit) better

It's been a very exciting week since we did our big Reader update. It's good to see that people have been liking our work. At the same time, we know there's still lots to do, which is why we've been busy fixing bugs and tweaking things in response to user feedback. Today we did a small release, a .0.1 of sorts. Here are some of the things that changed:

Pick your start page: You can now select which page you'd like to see when you first log in to Reader ("Home", "All items", or any folder or tag). Simply go to settings and on the Preferences tab pick which one you'd like to see.

Hiding the left side: If you'd like to get the list of subscriptions on the left out of the way so you can focus on what you're reading, you can just hit the u key (press it again to go back to the regular view).

Refreshing: We've added a small "Refresh" link at the bottom of the list of subscriptions, so you can easily refresh them to see if there are new items. Better yet, they will automatically refresh every few minutes, so you shouldn't even have to click the link. When an unread count has changed, it will flash yellow for a split-second to help you find it. This yellow fade made our Web 2.0 meter that we have in our office move up a tick.

Web 2.0 Meter

Space is smart again: The space key now intelligently goes from item to item and from page to page (for longer items), just like it used to in the old interface.

In addition to all this, we've also fixed a few bugs. Your feedback in the discussion group has been very helpful in helping us prioritize, so please keep posting there (even if we don't reply to every single message, we are reading all of your comments).

URL: http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2006/10/we-made-it-little-bit-better.html

Speex support

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Speex support

Interoperability is one of the biggest goals of Google Talk, so we've been committed to open standards from the very start. Google Talk furthers this commitment by offering support for Speex, the leading open-source voice codec.

When used with libjingle, Speex support provides developers the choice of another high-quality voice solution for interoperability with Google Talk. We also recommend Voice Engine Lite from our partner Global IP Sound.

Sean Egan
Software Engineer

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/10/speex-support.html

Thursday, September 28, 2006

Now anyone can Talk

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Now anyone can Talk

Google Talk is now open to everyone! Until now, users needed a Gmail account to use Google Talk. Now, anyone can use the service by creating a Google Account.

Happy Talking!

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/09/now-anyone-can-talk.html

Something looks... different.

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Something looks... different.

As of today, Google Reader has a new look — and even more important, a lot of new features that we think you'll like. We've listened to your feedback, done usability research, and examined all the ways that people consume content on the web, from feed readers to email clients. With a clean interface and some JavaScript wizardry, we think we've built an application that accommodates a wide range of reading styles while being fun and easy to use.

So what's new? First, we've added some things you've been asking for, such as unread counts and "mark all as read." Folder-based navigation makes it easier to organize your subscriptions, and the new expanded view lets you quickly scan over several items at once. And we've made sharing much easier - with a single click of the "shared" icon, you can publish an interesting item on your public sharing page for your friends to see. So give the new Reader a try. We hope you like it!

And what about the old interface? Well, things might look different, but we made sure the new interface enabled the reading style of current Reader users. For example, clicking "All items" and choosing "List view" should make the experience feel quite familiar. But since it's possible that we've overlooked your favorite feature from version 1, you still have the option (in "Settings") to switch back to the old interface for the time being. If you do, please let us know why so we can improve the new version to better suit your needs.

One last thing: Chris made a video for the launch. We think it's fun:

URL: http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2006/09/something-looks-different.html

Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Google Talk gives investors an edge

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Google Talk gives investors an edge

Hey, check out this press release by JPMorgan. I'm not an "institutional investor," but I still think it's pretty cool that they used our open platform to build a way for their clients to get updates as they're performing important trades. This isn't exactly one of the things we predicted when we launched Google Talk, but it just goes to show that there are way more useful things that people can do to enhance Google Talk than even we'd imagined.

Ana Yang
Product Marketing Manager

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/09/google-talk-gives-investors-edge.html

Friday, September 22, 2006

[G] Google Gadget Awards

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Inside Google Desktop: Google Gadget Awards



The Google Desktop Gadget Contest ended a few weeks ago, but if you're a college or university student in the U.S., we've got a new challenge for you. How do you feel about writing a gadget that (could) get you a date, is really smart or pretty, or that your friends just can't get enough of? We just launched the Google Gadget Awards, which challenges U.S. college students to create clever Google Gadgets. And we've got a great panel of judges, including
Commander Taco, Founder of Slashdot; Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired Magazine; and John Hennessy, President of Stanford University. We've seen some great entries in the past and are excited to see what you can come up with now.

If you're not a university student in the U.S., you can still create Google Gadgets. Although they won't be entered in the Awards, if they're clever enough you just might find them on desktops around the world.

URL: http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/2006/09/google-gadget-awards.html

Monday, September 11, 2006

Google Talk at Fall VON in Boston

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Google Talk at Fall VON in Boston

I'll be taking part in a panel discussion entitled "IM: The State of Presence". This panel should be lively since the industry is increasingly supporting interoperability among IM networks. We're particularly excited about this topic--a lot of our recent steps and announcements, such as the agreement with eBay, and our efforts to enable presence in more places like the web and mobile devices like the Sony mylo, Nokia 770, and RIM BlackBerry--have been focused on interoperability. We think this idea will only gain more traction as instant communications becomes more important in our lives, and we're looking forward to what the other panelists will have to share on this topic.

I'll post my thoughts and hopefully some photos when I get back.

Mike Jazayeri
Product Manager, Google Talk

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/09/google-talk-at-fall-von-in-boston.html

Monday, August 28, 2006

Talking with Skype

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Talking with Skype

Google Talk's got a new gig. Google and eBay have signed an agreement around text-based advertising and "click-to-call" advertising, in which Google Talk and Skype will power voice calls between customers and merchants. (Read the full press release here.)

Just as exciting are our plans to explore interoperability between Google Talk and Skype, making it easier for our users to chat with one another. This is just another step in our commitment to interoperability via open, industry standards.

Lewis Lin
Product Marketing Manager, Google Talk

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/08/talking-with-skype.html

Wednesday, August 23, 2006

Categorically Speaking

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Categorically Speaking

A wise man once said, 'Organization is paramount.' I'm not sure when this was first uttered; it could have slipped out while constructing Manhattan's downtown grid or connecting the green spaces of Berlin, but I agree. I like to have my clothes organized in drawers, my shoes organized against the wall, my money alphabetically organized in my wallet by president, and my Friends list organized according to available, busy, idle, and offline. It's mitigating. It's rational.

I want to share the joy of organization with all you Talkers out there. While we're making it easier to communicate in a number of ways, we should also make it easier for you to ask and answer questions about Google Talk. Of course, it may take a Talk engineer or a member of Talk support to answer some questions, but I think other users are a great resource - especially because there are millions of them.

We created Google Talk Help Discussion nearly a year ago, and until recently, there weren't any categories to organize the group. It was one hefty, unkempt sea of Talk knowledge. Oh, the sea was unfettered; it was confounded. Now, you can read and post messages under the appropriate category heading (About Google Talk, Problem-solving, Calls, Chats, and Voicemail, Third Party Clients). You can also read all the past discussions.

Log in to Google Talk, click Help, and then click user support discussion forum on the right side of our Help Center. Or just visit Talk Help Discuss, but you'll need to log in to your Google Account in order to post. This is an opportunity for Talkers to share practical information more efficiently. Categorically speaking, this is paramount.

Matt Baker
Online Operations Coordinator

URL: http://googletalk.blogspot.com/2006/08/categorically-speaking.html

Thursday, August 3, 2006

Namespaced Extensions in Feeds

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Namespaced Extensions in Feeds

Feeds can be used for more than just text; they can embed pictures, podcasts and video. There are even more esoteric bits of data that can be attached to feeds, like the geographic location that a post is about, the number of comments it has received and that (legal) license its contents are available under. To make all of this information easily parseable by computers, it is usually available as additional items and attributes in XML namespaces. For example, the Media RSS namespace is used to add more information about videos and pictures, like dimensions, duration and a thumbnail.

This usually isn't of direct interest to end users, it's just matter of which namespaced extensions a feed reader supports, and the more the merrier. However, since there are quite a few ones out there, developers must make trade-offs and decisions. One easy way to prioritize extension support is to see which ones are used more often.

I wrote a small MapReduce program to go over our BigTable and get the top 50 namespaces based on the number of feeds that use them. This means that we only looked at feeds that have at least one subscriber, i.e. the "feeds that matter." Note that the default namespaces for syndication feed formats (e.g. http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom for Atom 1.0) are excluded, since I was interested only in extensions to the elements that are already expected to be in a feed.

We thought this information might be of interest to others, the way our analysis of XML errors and web authoring statistics have been. If I have missed anything, or if you have any feedback, a message in our discussion group or a link to this blog post is the best way to reach us.

table#stats { border-spacing: 0; border-collapse: collapse; font-family: sans-serif; } table#stats code { color: #333; font-weight: bold; } table#stats thead { background: #eee; } table#stats th:first-child { white-space: nowrap; } table#stats td, table#stats th { border: solid 1px #ddd; vertical-align: top; padding: 0.1em 0.3em 0.1em 0.3em; } table#stats td:first-child { text-align: right; }
% of Feeds Namespace URI
29.36% Dublin Core http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/
15.71% XHTML http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml
11.92% Blogger Atom API Extensions http://www.blogger.com/atom/ns#
11.88% Blogger Draft Extension http://purl.org/atom-blog/ns#
11.16% RSS 1.0 Content Module http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/content/
8.39% Well-Formed Web Comment API http://wellformedweb.org/CommentAPI/
5.35% RSS 1.0 Administrative Module http://webns.net/mvcb/
3.85% FeedBurner Extensions http://rssnamespace.org/feedburner/ext/1.0
3.74% MSN Spaces http://schemas.microsoft.com/msn/spaces/2005/rss
3.66% Slash http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/slash/
3.59% RSS 1.0 Syndication Module http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/syndication/
2.50% iTunes http://www.itunes.com/dtds/podcast-1.0.dtd
2.49% LiveJournal RSS Module 1.0 http://www.livejournal.org/rss/lj/1.0/
2.33% Dublin Core Terms http://purl.org/dc/terms/
2.27% Microsoft Simple List Extensions http://www.microsoft.com/schemas/rss/core/2005
2.00% Yahoo Media RSS http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/
1.24% RSS 1.0 Taxonomy Module http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/taxonomy/
1.06% TrackBack Module for RSS 1.0/2.0 http://madskills.com/public/xml/rss/module/trackback/
1.04% creativeCommons RSS Module http://backend.userland.com/creativeCommonsRssModule
0.92% OpenSearch http://a9.com/-/spec/opensearchrss/1.1/
0.68% Basic Geo (WGS84 lat/long) Vocabulary http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#
0.54% Atom Threading http://purl.org/syndication/thread/1.0
0.42% Creative Commons (RDF) http://web.resource.org/cc/
0.39% Technorati API http://api.technorati.com/dtd/tapi-002.xml
0.36% Google Calendar http://schemas.google.com/gCal/2005
0.31% Google GData http://schemas.google.com/g/2005
0.28% Feed History http://purl.org/syndication/history/1.0
0.28% eBay urn:ebay:apis:eBLBaseComponents
0.27% Pheed http://www.pheed.com/pheed/
0.23% RSS 1.0 Annotation Module http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/annotation/
0.21% PRISM http://prismstandard.org/namespaces/1.2/basic/
0.18% Bulkfeeds http://bulkfeeds.net/xmlns#
0.16% Atom Indexing urn:atom-extension:indexing
0.15% AOL Journals http://journals.aol.com/_atom/aj#
0.14% Jive Forums http://www.jivesoftware.com/xmlns/jiveforums/rss
0.13% Yahoo! Weather http://xml.weather.yahoo.com/ns/rss/1.0
0.11% RSSWriter Manifest http://usefulinc.com/rss/manifest/
0.11% FOAF Vocabulary http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/
0.10% Feedster http://feedster.com/feedstersearch/ext/1.0
0.10% Google Picasa Web http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/picasaweb/
0.09% RSS 1.0 Link Module http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/link/
0.09% Buzznet http://www.buzznet.com/1.0/
0.09% Digg http://digg.com/docs/diggrss/
0.09% PubSub http://pubsub.com/xmlns
0.09% Snaplog PhotoBlog RSS extension http://snaplog.com/backend/PhotoBlog.html
0.08% XSL http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform
0.07% Hatena XML Namespace http://www.hatena.ne.jp/info/xmlns#
0.07% iTunes Music Store http://phobos.apple.com/rss/1.0/modules/itms/
0.07% Furl http://www.furl.net/resources/furlRSS.jsp#
0.06% Google Base http://base.google.com/cns/1.0
0.06% Web Wiz Forums http://syndication.webwizguide.info/rss_namespace/

URL: http://googlereader.blogspot.com/2006/08/namespaced-extensions-in-feeds.html